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COVID-19, SARS and MERS: A neurological perspective.
J Clin Neurosci. 2020 Jul; 77:13-16.JC

Abstract

Central to COVID-19 pathophysiology is an acute respiratory infection primarily manifesting as pneumonia. Two months into the COVID-19 outbreak, however, a retrospective study in China involving more than 200 participants revealed a neurological component to COVID-19 in a subset of patients. The observed symptoms, the cause of which remains unclear, included impaired consciousness, skeletal muscle injury and acute cerebrovascular disease, and appeared more frequently in severe disease. Since then, findings from several studies have hinted at various possible neurological outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Here, we review the historical association between neurological complications and highly pathological coronaviruses including SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. We draw from evidence derived from past coronavirus outbreaks, noting the similarities and differences between SARS and MERS, and the current COVID-19 pandemic. We end by briefly discussing possible mechanisms by which the coronavirus impacts on the human nervous system, as well as neurology-specific considerations that arise from the repercussions of COVID-19.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Square, London, UK.Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; UK Dementia Research Institute at University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Euan MacDonald Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: amehta@exseed.ed.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32417124

Citation

Ng Kee Kwong, Koy Chong, et al. "COVID-19, SARS and MERS: a Neurological Perspective." Journal of Clinical Neuroscience : Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia, vol. 77, 2020, pp. 13-16.
Ng Kee Kwong KC, Mehta PR, Shukla G, et al. COVID-19, SARS and MERS: A neurological perspective. J Clin Neurosci. 2020;77:13-16.
Ng Kee Kwong, K. C., Mehta, P. R., Shukla, G., & Mehta, A. R. (2020). COVID-19, SARS and MERS: A neurological perspective. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience : Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia, 77, 13-16. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2020.04.124
Ng Kee Kwong KC, et al. COVID-19, SARS and MERS: a Neurological Perspective. J Clin Neurosci. 2020;77:13-16. PubMed PMID: 32417124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - COVID-19, SARS and MERS: A neurological perspective. AU - Ng Kee Kwong,Koy Chong, AU - Mehta,Puja R, AU - Shukla,Garima, AU - Mehta,Arpan R, Y1 - 2020/05/05/ PY - 2020/04/29/received PY - 2020/04/30/accepted PY - 2020/5/18/pubmed PY - 2020/7/4/medline PY - 2020/5/18/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Coronavirus KW - MERS KW - Neurology KW - Neurotropism KW - SARS SP - 13 EP - 16 JF - Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia JO - J Clin Neurosci VL - 77 N2 - Central to COVID-19 pathophysiology is an acute respiratory infection primarily manifesting as pneumonia. Two months into the COVID-19 outbreak, however, a retrospective study in China involving more than 200 participants revealed a neurological component to COVID-19 in a subset of patients. The observed symptoms, the cause of which remains unclear, included impaired consciousness, skeletal muscle injury and acute cerebrovascular disease, and appeared more frequently in severe disease. Since then, findings from several studies have hinted at various possible neurological outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Here, we review the historical association between neurological complications and highly pathological coronaviruses including SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. We draw from evidence derived from past coronavirus outbreaks, noting the similarities and differences between SARS and MERS, and the current COVID-19 pandemic. We end by briefly discussing possible mechanisms by which the coronavirus impacts on the human nervous system, as well as neurology-specific considerations that arise from the repercussions of COVID-19. SN - 1532-2653 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32417124/COVID_19_SARS_and_MERS:_A_neurological_perspective_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0967-5868(20)31185-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -