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Vegetarian, pescatarian and flexitarian diets: sociodemographic determinants and association with cardiovascular risk factors in a Swiss urban population.
Br J Nutr. 2020 10 28; 124(8):844-852.BJ

Abstract

Prevalence and trends of different vegetarian diets remain unknown, with estimates varying depending on the source. Evidence suggests that vegetarian diets are associated with a more favourable cardiovascular risk profile. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and trends of different types of vegetarian diets in a population-based representative sample, sociodemographic characteristics of participants following such diets and the association of these diets with cardiovascular risk factors. Using repeated cross-sectional population-based surveys conducted in Geneva, Switzerland, 10 797 individuals participated in the study between 2005 and 2017. Participants were classified as vegetarians, pescatarians, flexitarians or omnivores using an FFQ. Sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated through questionnaires, anthropometric measurements and blood tests. Findings show prevalence of vegetarians increased from 0·5 to 1·2 %, pescatarians from 0·3 to 1·1 % and flexitarians remained stable at 15·6 % of the population over the study period. Compared with omnivores, vegetarians were more likely to be young (OR 2·38; 95 % CI 1·01, 5·6), have higher education (OR 1·59; 95 % CI 1·01, 2·49) and lower income (OR 1·83; 95 % CI 1·04, 3·21); pescatarians and flexitarians were more likely to be women (pescatarian: OR 1·81; 95 % CI 1·10, 3·00; vegetarian: OR 1·57; 95 % CI 1·41, 1·75) and flexitarians were also more likely to have a lower income (OR 1·31; 95 % CI 1·13, 1·53). Participants who adhered to any diet excluding/reducing meat intake had lower BMI, total cholesterol and hypertension compared with omnivores. The present study shows an increase in the prevalence of vegetarians over a 13-year period and suggests that the different vegetarian diets assessed are associated with a better cardiovascular risk profile.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205Geneva, Switzerland.Department of General Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205Geneva, Switzerland.Unit of Population Epidemiology, Department of Primary Care Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205Geneva, Switzerland.Unit of Population Epidemiology, Department of Primary Care Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205Geneva, Switzerland.Department of General Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205Geneva, Switzerland.Unit of Population Epidemiology, Department of Primary Care Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205Geneva, Switzerland. University Centre for General Medicine and Public Health, University of Lausanne, 1011Lausanne, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32418548

Citation

Wozniak, Hannah, et al. "Vegetarian, Pescatarian and Flexitarian Diets: Sociodemographic Determinants and Association With Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Swiss Urban Population." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 124, no. 8, 2020, pp. 844-852.
Wozniak H, Larpin C, de Mestral C, et al. Vegetarian, pescatarian and flexitarian diets: sociodemographic determinants and association with cardiovascular risk factors in a Swiss urban population. Br J Nutr. 2020;124(8):844-852.
Wozniak, H., Larpin, C., de Mestral, C., Guessous, I., Reny, J. L., & Stringhini, S. (2020). Vegetarian, pescatarian and flexitarian diets: sociodemographic determinants and association with cardiovascular risk factors in a Swiss urban population. The British Journal of Nutrition, 124(8), 844-852. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114520001762
Wozniak H, et al. Vegetarian, Pescatarian and Flexitarian Diets: Sociodemographic Determinants and Association With Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Swiss Urban Population. Br J Nutr. 2020 10 28;124(8):844-852. PubMed PMID: 32418548.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vegetarian, pescatarian and flexitarian diets: sociodemographic determinants and association with cardiovascular risk factors in a Swiss urban population. AU - Wozniak,Hannah, AU - Larpin,Christophe, AU - de Mestral,Carlos, AU - Guessous,Idris, AU - Reny,Jean-Luc, AU - Stringhini,Silvia, Y1 - 2020/05/18/ PY - 2020/5/19/pubmed PY - 2021/3/13/medline PY - 2020/5/19/entrez KW - Cardiovascular risk factors KW - Diet trends KW - Flexitarian diet KW - Pescatarian diet KW - Sociodemographic factors KW - Vegetarian diets KW - Vegetarian prevalence SP - 844 EP - 852 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 124 IS - 8 N2 - Prevalence and trends of different vegetarian diets remain unknown, with estimates varying depending on the source. Evidence suggests that vegetarian diets are associated with a more favourable cardiovascular risk profile. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and trends of different types of vegetarian diets in a population-based representative sample, sociodemographic characteristics of participants following such diets and the association of these diets with cardiovascular risk factors. Using repeated cross-sectional population-based surveys conducted in Geneva, Switzerland, 10 797 individuals participated in the study between 2005 and 2017. Participants were classified as vegetarians, pescatarians, flexitarians or omnivores using an FFQ. Sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated through questionnaires, anthropometric measurements and blood tests. Findings show prevalence of vegetarians increased from 0·5 to 1·2 %, pescatarians from 0·3 to 1·1 % and flexitarians remained stable at 15·6 % of the population over the study period. Compared with omnivores, vegetarians were more likely to be young (OR 2·38; 95 % CI 1·01, 5·6), have higher education (OR 1·59; 95 % CI 1·01, 2·49) and lower income (OR 1·83; 95 % CI 1·04, 3·21); pescatarians and flexitarians were more likely to be women (pescatarian: OR 1·81; 95 % CI 1·10, 3·00; vegetarian: OR 1·57; 95 % CI 1·41, 1·75) and flexitarians were also more likely to have a lower income (OR 1·31; 95 % CI 1·13, 1·53). Participants who adhered to any diet excluding/reducing meat intake had lower BMI, total cholesterol and hypertension compared with omnivores. The present study shows an increase in the prevalence of vegetarians over a 13-year period and suggests that the different vegetarian diets assessed are associated with a better cardiovascular risk profile. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32418548/Vegetarian_pescatarian_and_flexitarian_diets:_sociodemographic_determinants_and_association_with_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_a_Swiss_urban_population_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114520001762/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -