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A longitudinal study using parental cognitions based on the theory of planned behavior to predict childhood influenza vaccination.
J Infect Public Health. 2020 Jul; 13(7):970-979.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The World Health Organization recommends young children aged 6-59 months receive influenza vaccination (IV) annually. This study investigated the IV incidence in a 12-month follow-up period among 24-59 month-old children and identified its predictors based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

METHODS

A population-based random telephone survey was conducted at baseline (March-June 2011) among Chinese parents of 24-59 month-old children in Hong Kong, China, and a follow-up survey was conducted 12 months afterwards (N=440).

RESULTS

The IV prevalence was 63.2% at follow-up (3% increased from baseline). The IV incidence during the follow-up period for all sampled, ever-vaccinated, and never-vaccinated children was 35.6, 58.5, and 7.7 per 100 person-years, respectively. Stratified analyses of logistic regression were performed for the ever-vaccinated and never-vaccinated children. After adjusting for significant socio-demographic variable(s), parental positive attitude, norm, and behavioral intention were significant predictors of IV at follow-up among ever-vaccinated children, while intention was the only significant predictor among never-vaccinated children.

CONCLUSIONS

Most of the IVs received during the follow-up period were re-vaccinations rather than first-time vaccinations. Efforts should target never-vaccinated children's parents, who reported low incidence and intention. TPB also worked less well among never-vaccinated children, and thus research for other predictors of never-vaccinated children's first-time vaccination are warranted. Promotion programs should consider segmentation by children's prior vaccination status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Macau, Macao, China.Centre for Health Behaviours Research, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: jlau@cuhk.edu.hk.Centre for Health Behaviours Research, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Centre for Health Behaviours Research, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Centre for Health Behaviours Research, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32418882

Citation

Wu, Anise M S., et al. "A Longitudinal Study Using Parental Cognitions Based On the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Childhood Influenza Vaccination." Journal of Infection and Public Health, vol. 13, no. 7, 2020, pp. 970-979.
Wu AMS, Lau JTF, Ma YL, et al. A longitudinal study using parental cognitions based on the theory of planned behavior to predict childhood influenza vaccination. J Infect Public Health. 2020;13(7):970-979.
Wu, A. M. S., Lau, J. T. F., Ma, Y. L., Cheng, K. M., & Lau, M. M. C. (2020). A longitudinal study using parental cognitions based on the theory of planned behavior to predict childhood influenza vaccination. Journal of Infection and Public Health, 13(7), 970-979. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2020.04.009
Wu AMS, et al. A Longitudinal Study Using Parental Cognitions Based On the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Childhood Influenza Vaccination. J Infect Public Health. 2020;13(7):970-979. PubMed PMID: 32418882.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A longitudinal study using parental cognitions based on the theory of planned behavior to predict childhood influenza vaccination. AU - Wu,Anise M S, AU - Lau,Joseph T F, AU - Ma,Yee-Ling, AU - Cheng,Kit-Man, AU - Lau,Mason M C, Y1 - 2020/05/14/ PY - 2020/01/05/received PY - 2020/04/03/revised PY - 2020/04/19/accepted PY - 2020/5/19/pubmed PY - 2020/5/19/medline PY - 2020/5/19/entrez KW - Influenza KW - Prior experience KW - Theory of planned behavior KW - Vaccination KW - Young children SP - 970 EP - 979 JF - Journal of infection and public health JO - J Infect Public Health VL - 13 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization recommends young children aged 6-59 months receive influenza vaccination (IV) annually. This study investigated the IV incidence in a 12-month follow-up period among 24-59 month-old children and identified its predictors based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB). METHODS: A population-based random telephone survey was conducted at baseline (March-June 2011) among Chinese parents of 24-59 month-old children in Hong Kong, China, and a follow-up survey was conducted 12 months afterwards (N=440). RESULTS: The IV prevalence was 63.2% at follow-up (3% increased from baseline). The IV incidence during the follow-up period for all sampled, ever-vaccinated, and never-vaccinated children was 35.6, 58.5, and 7.7 per 100 person-years, respectively. Stratified analyses of logistic regression were performed for the ever-vaccinated and never-vaccinated children. After adjusting for significant socio-demographic variable(s), parental positive attitude, norm, and behavioral intention were significant predictors of IV at follow-up among ever-vaccinated children, while intention was the only significant predictor among never-vaccinated children. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the IVs received during the follow-up period were re-vaccinations rather than first-time vaccinations. Efforts should target never-vaccinated children's parents, who reported low incidence and intention. TPB also worked less well among never-vaccinated children, and thus research for other predictors of never-vaccinated children's first-time vaccination are warranted. Promotion programs should consider segmentation by children's prior vaccination status. SN - 1876-035X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32418882/A_longitudinal_study_using_parental_cognitions_based_on_the_theory_of_planned_behavior_to_predict_childhood_influenza_vaccination_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1876-0341(20)30446-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -