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Case presentation methods: a randomized controlled trial of the one-minute preceptor versus SNAPPS in a controlled setting.
Perspect Med Educ. 2020 08; 9(4):245-250.PM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

One-minute preceptor (OMP) and SNAPPS (a mnemonic for Summarize history and findings; Narrow the differential; Analyze the differential; Probe the preceptor about uncertainties; Plan management; and Select case-related issues for self-study) are educational techniques developed to promote learners' expression of clinical reasoning during the case presentation in the workplace. The aim of this present study was to compare the content of the case presentation between the SNAPPS and the OMP methods.

METHODS

This was a randomized controlled trial comparing SNAPPS and OMP in 60 medical students at the beginning of their fifth year of medical school. After an introduction session, students presented and discussed two cases based on real patients and provided in written format. All case presentations were recorded and evaluated by two researchers. The assessed elements of the case presentations were divided into three subgroups related to expression of clinical reasoning, time and initiative to guide the presentation.

RESULTS

There were 30 participants in each group. There was no difference in the expression of clinical reasoning between OMP and SNAPPS groups (number of differential diagnoses, justification of most likely diagnosis and differential diagnosis, expression of comparing and contrasting hypotheses). However, students in the SNAPPS group expressed significantly more questions and uncertainties (p < 0.001), and more often took the initiative to present and justify the most likely diagnosis, differential diagnosis and management plan than students in the OMP group, both in simple and complex cases (all p values <0.001) without extending the length of the teaching session.

CONCLUSION

OMP and SNAPPS equally promote medical students' expression of clinical reasoning. The SNAPPS technique was more effective than the OMP technique in helping students to take on an active role during case presentation. We propose SNAPPS as an effective learning tool, engaging students and promoting the expression of their clinical reasoning as part of a case presentation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. eleonoradruve@uol.com.br.Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.Department of Pediatrics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil. Center for Education Development and Research in Health Professions, University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.Center for Education Development and Research in Health Professions, University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32430879

Citation

Fagundes, Eleonora D T., et al. "Case Presentation Methods: a Randomized Controlled Trial of the One-minute Preceptor Versus SNAPPS in a Controlled Setting." Perspectives On Medical Education, vol. 9, no. 4, 2020, pp. 245-250.
Fagundes EDT, Ibiapina CC, Alvim CG, et al. Case presentation methods: a randomized controlled trial of the one-minute preceptor versus SNAPPS in a controlled setting. Perspect Med Educ. 2020;9(4):245-250.
Fagundes, E. D. T., Ibiapina, C. C., Alvim, C. G., Fernandes, R. A. F., Carvalho-Filho, M. A., & Brand, P. L. P. (2020). Case presentation methods: a randomized controlled trial of the one-minute preceptor versus SNAPPS in a controlled setting. Perspectives On Medical Education, 9(4), 245-250. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40037-020-00588-y
Fagundes EDT, et al. Case Presentation Methods: a Randomized Controlled Trial of the One-minute Preceptor Versus SNAPPS in a Controlled Setting. Perspect Med Educ. 2020;9(4):245-250. PubMed PMID: 32430879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Case presentation methods: a randomized controlled trial of the one-minute preceptor versus SNAPPS in a controlled setting. AU - Fagundes,Eleonora D T, AU - Ibiapina,Cássio C, AU - Alvim,Cristina G, AU - Fernandes,Rachel A F, AU - Carvalho-Filho,Marco Antônio, AU - Brand,Paul L P, PY - 2020/5/21/pubmed PY - 2021/5/5/medline PY - 2020/5/21/entrez KW - Case presentation KW - Clinical reasoning KW - One-minute preceptor KW - SNAPPS SP - 245 EP - 250 JF - Perspectives on medical education JO - Perspect Med Educ VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: One-minute preceptor (OMP) and SNAPPS (a mnemonic for Summarize history and findings; Narrow the differential; Analyze the differential; Probe the preceptor about uncertainties; Plan management; and Select case-related issues for self-study) are educational techniques developed to promote learners' expression of clinical reasoning during the case presentation in the workplace. The aim of this present study was to compare the content of the case presentation between the SNAPPS and the OMP methods. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial comparing SNAPPS and OMP in 60 medical students at the beginning of their fifth year of medical school. After an introduction session, students presented and discussed two cases based on real patients and provided in written format. All case presentations were recorded and evaluated by two researchers. The assessed elements of the case presentations were divided into three subgroups related to expression of clinical reasoning, time and initiative to guide the presentation. RESULTS: There were 30 participants in each group. There was no difference in the expression of clinical reasoning between OMP and SNAPPS groups (number of differential diagnoses, justification of most likely diagnosis and differential diagnosis, expression of comparing and contrasting hypotheses). However, students in the SNAPPS group expressed significantly more questions and uncertainties (p < 0.001), and more often took the initiative to present and justify the most likely diagnosis, differential diagnosis and management plan than students in the OMP group, both in simple and complex cases (all p values <0.001) without extending the length of the teaching session. CONCLUSION: OMP and SNAPPS equally promote medical students' expression of clinical reasoning. The SNAPPS technique was more effective than the OMP technique in helping students to take on an active role during case presentation. We propose SNAPPS as an effective learning tool, engaging students and promoting the expression of their clinical reasoning as part of a case presentation. SN - 2212-277X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32430879/Case_presentation_methods:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_of_the_one_minute_preceptor_versus_SNAPPS_in_a_controlled_setting_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40037-020-00588-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -