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Galleria mellonella as a Novelty in vivo Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction for Malassezia furfur CBS 1878 and Malassezia pachydermatis CBS 1879.

Abstract

Malassezia furfur and Malassezia pachydermatis are lipophilic and lipid dependent yeasts, associated with the skin microbiota in humans and domestic animals, respectively. Although they are commensals, under specific conditions they become pathogens, causing skin conditions, such as pityriasis versicolor, dandruff/seborrheic dermatitis, folliculitis in humans, and dermatitis and otitis in dogs. Additionally, these species are associated with fungemia in immunocompromised patients and low-weight neonates in intensive care units with intravenous catheters or with parenteral nutrition and that are under-treatment of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The host-pathogen interaction mechanism in these yeasts is still unclear; for this reason, it is necessary to implement suitable new host systems, such as Galleria mellonella. This infection model has been widely used to assess virulence, host-pathogen interaction, and antimicrobial activity in bacteria and fungi. Some advantages of the G. mellonella model are: (1) the immune response has phagocytic cells and antimicrobial peptides that are similar to those in the innate immune response of human beings; (2) no ethical implications; (3) low cost; and (4) easy to handle and inoculate. This study aims to establish G. mellonella as an in vivo infection model for M. furfur and M. pachydermatis. To achieve this objective, first, G. mellonella larvae were first inoculated with different inoculum concentrations of these two Malassezia species, 1.5 × 106 CFU/mL, 1.5 × 107 CFU/mL, 1.5 × 108 CFU/mL, and 11.5 × 109 CFU/mL, and incubated at 33 and 37°C. Then, for 15 days, the mortality and melanization were evaluated daily. Finally, the characterization of hemocytes and fungal burden assessment were as carried out. It was found that at 33 and 37°C both M. furfur and M. pachydermatis successfully established a systemic infection in G. mellonella. M. pachydermatis proved to be slightly more virulent than M. furfur at a temperature of 37°C. The results suggest that larvae mortality and melanization is dependent on the specie of Malassezia, the inoculum concentration and the temperature. According to the findings, G. mellonella can be used as an in vivo model of infection to conduct easy and reliable approaches to boost our knowledge of the Malassezia genus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Grupo de Investigación Celular y Molecular de Microorganismos Patógenos (CeMoP), Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.Grupo de Investigación Celular y Molecular de Microorganismos Patógenos (CeMoP), Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.Grupo de Investigación Celular y Molecular de Microorganismos Patógenos (CeMoP), Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.Grupo de Investigación Celular y Molecular de Microorganismos Patógenos (CeMoP), Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.Unidad de Investigación en Proteómica y Micosis Humanas, Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.Grupo de Investigación Celular y Molecular de Microorganismos Patógenos (CeMoP), Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32432057

Citation

Torres, Maritza, et al. "Galleria Mellonella as a Novelty in Vivo Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction for Malassezia Furfur CBS 1878 and Malassezia Pachydermatis CBS 1879." Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, vol. 10, 2020, p. 199.
Torres M, Pinzón EN, Rey FM, et al. Galleria mellonella as a Novelty in vivo Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction for Malassezia furfur CBS 1878 and Malassezia pachydermatis CBS 1879. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2020;10:199.
Torres, M., Pinzón, E. N., Rey, F. M., Martinez, H., Parra Giraldo, C. M., & Celis Ramírez, A. M. (2020). Galleria mellonella as a Novelty in vivo Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction for Malassezia furfur CBS 1878 and Malassezia pachydermatis CBS 1879. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 10, 199. https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2020.00199
Torres M, et al. Galleria Mellonella as a Novelty in Vivo Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction for Malassezia Furfur CBS 1878 and Malassezia Pachydermatis CBS 1879. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2020;10:199. PubMed PMID: 32432057.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Galleria mellonella as a Novelty in vivo Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction for Malassezia furfur CBS 1878 and Malassezia pachydermatis CBS 1879. AU - Torres,Maritza, AU - Pinzón,Elkin Nicolás, AU - Rey,Flor Maria, AU - Martinez,Heydys, AU - Parra Giraldo,Claudia Marcela, AU - Celis Ramírez,Adriana Marcela, Y1 - 2020/05/05/ PY - 2020/02/26/received PY - 2020/04/15/accepted PY - 2020/5/21/entrez PY - 2020/5/21/pubmed PY - 2020/5/21/medline KW - Galleria mellonella KW - Malassezia furfur KW - Malassezia pachydermatis KW - host-pathogen interaction KW - infection model SP - 199 EP - 199 JF - Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology JO - Front Cell Infect Microbiol VL - 10 N2 - Malassezia furfur and Malassezia pachydermatis are lipophilic and lipid dependent yeasts, associated with the skin microbiota in humans and domestic animals, respectively. Although they are commensals, under specific conditions they become pathogens, causing skin conditions, such as pityriasis versicolor, dandruff/seborrheic dermatitis, folliculitis in humans, and dermatitis and otitis in dogs. Additionally, these species are associated with fungemia in immunocompromised patients and low-weight neonates in intensive care units with intravenous catheters or with parenteral nutrition and that are under-treatment of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The host-pathogen interaction mechanism in these yeasts is still unclear; for this reason, it is necessary to implement suitable new host systems, such as Galleria mellonella. This infection model has been widely used to assess virulence, host-pathogen interaction, and antimicrobial activity in bacteria and fungi. Some advantages of the G. mellonella model are: (1) the immune response has phagocytic cells and antimicrobial peptides that are similar to those in the innate immune response of human beings; (2) no ethical implications; (3) low cost; and (4) easy to handle and inoculate. This study aims to establish G. mellonella as an in vivo infection model for M. furfur and M. pachydermatis. To achieve this objective, first, G. mellonella larvae were first inoculated with different inoculum concentrations of these two Malassezia species, 1.5 × 106 CFU/mL, 1.5 × 107 CFU/mL, 1.5 × 108 CFU/mL, and 11.5 × 109 CFU/mL, and incubated at 33 and 37°C. Then, for 15 days, the mortality and melanization were evaluated daily. Finally, the characterization of hemocytes and fungal burden assessment were as carried out. It was found that at 33 and 37°C both M. furfur and M. pachydermatis successfully established a systemic infection in G. mellonella. M. pachydermatis proved to be slightly more virulent than M. furfur at a temperature of 37°C. The results suggest that larvae mortality and melanization is dependent on the specie of Malassezia, the inoculum concentration and the temperature. According to the findings, G. mellonella can be used as an in vivo model of infection to conduct easy and reliable approaches to boost our knowledge of the Malassezia genus. SN - 2235-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32432057/Galleria_mellonella_as_a_Novelty_in_vivo_Model_of_Host-Pathogen_Interaction_for_Malassezia_furfur_CBS_1878_and_Malassezia_pachydermatis_CBS_1879 L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2020.00199 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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