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Effectiveness of Common Fabrics to Block Aqueous Aerosols of Virus-like Nanoparticles.
ACS Nano. 2020 06 23; 14(6):7651-7658.AN

Abstract

Layered systems of commonly available fabric materials can be used by the public and healthcare providers in face masks to reduce the risk of inhaling viruses with protection that is about equivalent to or better than the filtration and adsorption offered by 5-layer N95 respirators. Over 70 different common fabric combinations and masks were evaluated under steady-state, forced convection air flux with pulsed aerosols that simulate forceful respiration. The aerosols contain fluorescent virus-like nanoparticles to track transmission through materials that greatly assist the accuracy of detection, thus avoiding artifacts including pore flooding and the loss of aerosol due to evaporation and droplet breakup. Effective materials comprise both absorbent, hydrophilic layers and barrier, hydrophobic layers. Although the hydrophobic layers can adhere virus-like nanoparticles, they may also repel droplets from adjacent absorbent layers and prevent wicking transport across the fabric system. Effective designs are noted with absorbent layers comprising terry cloth towel, quilting cotton, and flannel. Effective designs are noted with barrier layers comprising nonwoven polypropylene, polyester, and polyaramid.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States.Department of General Surgery, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts 01805, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32438799

Citation

Lustig, Steven R., et al. "Effectiveness of Common Fabrics to Block Aqueous Aerosols of Virus-like Nanoparticles." ACS Nano, vol. 14, no. 6, 2020, pp. 7651-7658.
Lustig SR, Biswakarma JJH, Rana D, et al. Effectiveness of Common Fabrics to Block Aqueous Aerosols of Virus-like Nanoparticles. ACS Nano. 2020;14(6):7651-7658.
Lustig, S. R., Biswakarma, J. J. H., Rana, D., Tilford, S. H., Hu, W., Su, M., & Rosenblatt, M. S. (2020). Effectiveness of Common Fabrics to Block Aqueous Aerosols of Virus-like Nanoparticles. ACS Nano, 14(6), 7651-7658. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.0c03972
Lustig SR, et al. Effectiveness of Common Fabrics to Block Aqueous Aerosols of Virus-like Nanoparticles. ACS Nano. 2020 06 23;14(6):7651-7658. PubMed PMID: 32438799.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness of Common Fabrics to Block Aqueous Aerosols of Virus-like Nanoparticles. AU - Lustig,Steven R, AU - Biswakarma,John J H, AU - Rana,Devyesh, AU - Tilford,Susan H, AU - Hu,Weike, AU - Su,Ming, AU - Rosenblatt,Michael S, Y1 - 2020/05/29/ PY - 2020/5/23/pubmed PY - 2020/7/3/medline PY - 2020/5/23/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - face mask KW - filtration efficiency KW - nanoparticles KW - personal protective equipment SP - 7651 EP - 7658 JF - ACS nano JO - ACS Nano VL - 14 IS - 6 N2 - Layered systems of commonly available fabric materials can be used by the public and healthcare providers in face masks to reduce the risk of inhaling viruses with protection that is about equivalent to or better than the filtration and adsorption offered by 5-layer N95 respirators. Over 70 different common fabric combinations and masks were evaluated under steady-state, forced convection air flux with pulsed aerosols that simulate forceful respiration. The aerosols contain fluorescent virus-like nanoparticles to track transmission through materials that greatly assist the accuracy of detection, thus avoiding artifacts including pore flooding and the loss of aerosol due to evaporation and droplet breakup. Effective materials comprise both absorbent, hydrophilic layers and barrier, hydrophobic layers. Although the hydrophobic layers can adhere virus-like nanoparticles, they may also repel droplets from adjacent absorbent layers and prevent wicking transport across the fabric system. Effective designs are noted with absorbent layers comprising terry cloth towel, quilting cotton, and flannel. Effective designs are noted with barrier layers comprising nonwoven polypropylene, polyester, and polyaramid. SN - 1936-086X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32438799/Effectiveness_of_Common_Fabrics_to_Block_Aqueous_Aerosols_of_Virus_like_Nanoparticles_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.0c03972 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -