Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli from animal food sources in Mauritius: Prevalence, serogroup diversity and virulence profiles.
Int J Food Microbiol. 2020 Jul 02; 324:108589.IJ

Abstract

Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are important human pathogens associated with diarrhea and in some cases haemorrhagic colitis. Contaminated food derived from cattle and wildlife species are often associated with disease outbreaks. In this study, we report the prevalence, serogroup diversity and virulence profiles of STEC strains derived from cattle, rusa deer and pig. Of the 422 samples analyzed, STEC were detected in 40% (80/200) of cattle, 27.0% (33/122) of deer and 13.0% (13/100) of pigs. STEC isolates belonged to 38 O-serogroups whereby 5.2% (24/462) of the isolates belonged to clinically important EHEC-7 serogroups: O26 (n = 2), O103 (n = 1), O145 (n = 3) and O157 (n = 18). Fourteen serogroups (O26, O51, O84, O91, O100, O104, O110, O117, O145, O146, O156, O157, O177 and ONT) displayed multiple virulence profiles. We also identified two serovars (O117 and O119) in deer which are not well-documented in epidemiological surveys. 73.7% (28/38) of recovered O-serogroups are known to be associated with serious human illnesses including haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and bloody diarrhea. STEC isolates harboring single genotypes stx1, stx2, eae and hlyA accounted for 3.0% (14/462), 9.1% (42/462), 47.6% (220/462) and 1.7% (8/462) of all STEC isolates screened, respectively. Virulence combinations stx1 and stx2 were harboured by 1.3% of isolates while strains with genetic profiles eae/hlyA were the second most prevalent amongst STEC isolates. The full known virulent genotypes (stx2/eae, stx1/stx2/eae, stx1/stx2/hlyA and stx2/eae/hlyA) were present in 22 of the 462 STEC strains. A total of 10 different virulence patterns were recovered amongst animal species. Phylogeny of the gnd gene showed that amongst STEC strains, serovar O100 outlined the main cluster. Fourteen (n = 14) different sequence types (STs) were identified from a panel of twenty (n = 20) STEC isolates. One of the isolate (PG007B) possessed a unique ST (adk 10, fumC 693, gyrB 4, icd 1, mdh 8, purA 8, recA 2) that could not be assigned using MLST databases. None of the ST's recovered in deer were observed in domestic species. Our findings shows that food associated animals found on the tropical island of Mauritius carry a diversity of STEC strains with many serovars known to be associated with human disease. This report indicates that increased awareness, surveillance and hygienic attention at critical stages of the human food chain are warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Agricultural and Food Science, University of Mauritius, Réduit 80837, Mauritius. Electronic address: liondu400m_@hotmail.com.Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Cupecoy, Sint Maarten, Netherlands.Department of Agricultural and Food Science, University of Mauritius, Réduit 80837, Mauritius.Department of Agricultural and Food Science, University of Mauritius, Réduit 80837, Mauritius.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32442794

Citation

Thierry, S I L., et al. "Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia Coli From Animal Food Sources in Mauritius: Prevalence, Serogroup Diversity and Virulence Profiles." International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 324, 2020, p. 108589.
Thierry SIL, Gannon JE, Jaufeerally-Fakim Y, et al. Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli from animal food sources in Mauritius: Prevalence, serogroup diversity and virulence profiles. Int J Food Microbiol. 2020;324:108589.
Thierry, S. I. L., Gannon, J. E., Jaufeerally-Fakim, Y., & Santchurn, S. J. (2020). Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli from animal food sources in Mauritius: Prevalence, serogroup diversity and virulence profiles. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 324, 108589. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2020.108589
Thierry SIL, et al. Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia Coli From Animal Food Sources in Mauritius: Prevalence, Serogroup Diversity and Virulence Profiles. Int J Food Microbiol. 2020 Jul 2;324:108589. PubMed PMID: 32442794.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli from animal food sources in Mauritius: Prevalence, serogroup diversity and virulence profiles. AU - Thierry,S I L, AU - Gannon,J E, AU - Jaufeerally-Fakim,Y, AU - Santchurn,S J, Y1 - 2020/03/21/ PY - 2019/09/04/received PY - 2020/03/10/revised PY - 2020/03/11/accepted PY - 2020/5/23/pubmed PY - 2020/7/21/medline PY - 2020/5/23/entrez KW - Domestic and wildlife animals KW - Escherichia coli KW - Food safety KW - Indian Ocean islands KW - Public health KW - Surveillance SP - 108589 EP - 108589 JF - International journal of food microbiology JO - Int J Food Microbiol VL - 324 N2 - Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are important human pathogens associated with diarrhea and in some cases haemorrhagic colitis. Contaminated food derived from cattle and wildlife species are often associated with disease outbreaks. In this study, we report the prevalence, serogroup diversity and virulence profiles of STEC strains derived from cattle, rusa deer and pig. Of the 422 samples analyzed, STEC were detected in 40% (80/200) of cattle, 27.0% (33/122) of deer and 13.0% (13/100) of pigs. STEC isolates belonged to 38 O-serogroups whereby 5.2% (24/462) of the isolates belonged to clinically important EHEC-7 serogroups: O26 (n = 2), O103 (n = 1), O145 (n = 3) and O157 (n = 18). Fourteen serogroups (O26, O51, O84, O91, O100, O104, O110, O117, O145, O146, O156, O157, O177 and ONT) displayed multiple virulence profiles. We also identified two serovars (O117 and O119) in deer which are not well-documented in epidemiological surveys. 73.7% (28/38) of recovered O-serogroups are known to be associated with serious human illnesses including haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and bloody diarrhea. STEC isolates harboring single genotypes stx1, stx2, eae and hlyA accounted for 3.0% (14/462), 9.1% (42/462), 47.6% (220/462) and 1.7% (8/462) of all STEC isolates screened, respectively. Virulence combinations stx1 and stx2 were harboured by 1.3% of isolates while strains with genetic profiles eae/hlyA were the second most prevalent amongst STEC isolates. The full known virulent genotypes (stx2/eae, stx1/stx2/eae, stx1/stx2/hlyA and stx2/eae/hlyA) were present in 22 of the 462 STEC strains. A total of 10 different virulence patterns were recovered amongst animal species. Phylogeny of the gnd gene showed that amongst STEC strains, serovar O100 outlined the main cluster. Fourteen (n = 14) different sequence types (STs) were identified from a panel of twenty (n = 20) STEC isolates. One of the isolate (PG007B) possessed a unique ST (adk 10, fumC 693, gyrB 4, icd 1, mdh 8, purA 8, recA 2) that could not be assigned using MLST databases. None of the ST's recovered in deer were observed in domestic species. Our findings shows that food associated animals found on the tropical island of Mauritius carry a diversity of STEC strains with many serovars known to be associated with human disease. This report indicates that increased awareness, surveillance and hygienic attention at critical stages of the human food chain are warranted. SN - 1879-3460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32442794/Shiga_toxigenic_Escherichia_coli_from_animal_food_sources_in_Mauritius:_Prevalence_serogroup_diversity_and_virulence_profiles_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-1605(20)30083-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -