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Toxic impacts of rutile titanium dioxide in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to warming conditions.
Chemosphere. 2020 Aug; 252:126563.C

Abstract

Climate change is leading to a gradual increase in the ocean temperature, which can cause physiological and biochemical impairments in aquatic organisms. Along with the environmental changes, the presence of emerging pollutants such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) in marine coastal systems has also been a topic of concern, especially considering the interactive effects that both factors may present to inhabiting organisms. In the present study, it has been assessed the effects of the presence in water of particles of rutile, the most common polymorph of TiO2, in Mytilus galloprovincialis, under actual and predicted warming conditions. Organisms were exposed to different concentrations of rutile (0, 5, 50, 100 μg/L) at control (18 ± 1.0 °C) and increased (22 ± 1.0 °C) temperatures. Histopathological and biochemical changes were evaluated in mussels after 28 days of exposure. Histopathological examination revealed similar alterations on mussels' gills and digestive glands with increasing rutile concentrations at both temperatures. Biochemical markers showed that contaminated mussels have an unchanged metabolic capacity at 18 °C, which increased at 22 °C. Although antioxidant defences were activated in contaminated organisms at 22 °C, cellular damage was still observed. Overall, our findings showed that histopathological impacts occurred after rutile exposure regardless of the temperature, while biochemical alterations were only significantly noticeable when temperature was enhanced to 22 °C. Thus, this study demonstrated that temperature rise may significantly enhance the sensitivity of bivalves towards emerging pollutants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.Departamento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.Departamento de Química & CESAM/LAQV-REQUIMTE, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal; CIIMAR, Universidade do Porto, 4050-123 Porto, Portugal.Dipartimento di Biologia, Universitá degli studi di Napoli Federico II, 80126, Napoli, Italy.Dipartimento di Biologia, Universitá degli studi di Napoli Federico II, 80126, Napoli, Italy.CICECO- Instituto de Materiais de Aveiro, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais e Cerâmica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.CICECO- Instituto de Materiais de Aveiro, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais e Cerâmica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal; Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Center for Sustainable Future Technologies, Via Livorno, 60, 10144, Torino TO, Italy.CICECO- Instituto de Materiais de Aveiro, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais e Cerâmica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.Departamento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.Departamento de Química & CESAM/LAQV-REQUIMTE, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.Departamento de Biologia & CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal. Electronic address: rosafreitas@ua.pt.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32443264

Citation

Leite, Carla, et al. "Toxic Impacts of Rutile Titanium Dioxide in Mytilus Galloprovincialis Exposed to Warming Conditions." Chemosphere, vol. 252, 2020, p. 126563.
Leite C, Coppola F, Monteiro R, et al. Toxic impacts of rutile titanium dioxide in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to warming conditions. Chemosphere. 2020;252:126563.
Leite, C., Coppola, F., Monteiro, R., Russo, T., Polese, G., Silva, M. R. F., Lourenço, M. A. O., Ferreira, P., Soares, A. M. V. M., Pereira, E., & Freitas, R. (2020). Toxic impacts of rutile titanium dioxide in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to warming conditions. Chemosphere, 252, 126563. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.126563
Leite C, et al. Toxic Impacts of Rutile Titanium Dioxide in Mytilus Galloprovincialis Exposed to Warming Conditions. Chemosphere. 2020;252:126563. PubMed PMID: 32443264.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Toxic impacts of rutile titanium dioxide in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to warming conditions. AU - Leite,Carla, AU - Coppola,Francesca, AU - Monteiro,Rui, AU - Russo,Tania, AU - Polese,Gianluca, AU - Silva,Mariana R F, AU - Lourenço,Mirtha A O, AU - Ferreira,Paula, AU - Soares,Amadeu M V M, AU - Pereira,Eduarda, AU - Freitas,Rosa, Y1 - 2020/03/23/ PY - 2020/01/23/received PY - 2020/03/17/revised PY - 2020/03/18/accepted PY - 2020/5/24/entrez PY - 2020/5/24/pubmed PY - 2020/6/19/medline KW - Climate changes KW - Histopathology KW - Metabolism KW - Mussels KW - Oxidative stress KW - Titanium dioxide SP - 126563 EP - 126563 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 252 N2 - Climate change is leading to a gradual increase in the ocean temperature, which can cause physiological and biochemical impairments in aquatic organisms. Along with the environmental changes, the presence of emerging pollutants such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) in marine coastal systems has also been a topic of concern, especially considering the interactive effects that both factors may present to inhabiting organisms. In the present study, it has been assessed the effects of the presence in water of particles of rutile, the most common polymorph of TiO2, in Mytilus galloprovincialis, under actual and predicted warming conditions. Organisms were exposed to different concentrations of rutile (0, 5, 50, 100 μg/L) at control (18 ± 1.0 °C) and increased (22 ± 1.0 °C) temperatures. Histopathological and biochemical changes were evaluated in mussels after 28 days of exposure. Histopathological examination revealed similar alterations on mussels' gills and digestive glands with increasing rutile concentrations at both temperatures. Biochemical markers showed that contaminated mussels have an unchanged metabolic capacity at 18 °C, which increased at 22 °C. Although antioxidant defences were activated in contaminated organisms at 22 °C, cellular damage was still observed. Overall, our findings showed that histopathological impacts occurred after rutile exposure regardless of the temperature, while biochemical alterations were only significantly noticeable when temperature was enhanced to 22 °C. Thus, this study demonstrated that temperature rise may significantly enhance the sensitivity of bivalves towards emerging pollutants. SN - 1879-1298 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32443264/Toxic_impacts_of_rutile_titanium_dioxide_in_Mytilus_galloprovincialis_exposed_to_warming_conditions L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(20)30756-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -