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Race- and sex-specific association between alcohol consumption and hypertension in 22 cohort studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2020 07 24; 30(8):1249-1259.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

The alcohol-hypertension relation has been well documented, but whether women have protective effect or race and type of beverage consumed affect the association remain unclear. To quantify the relation between total or beverage-specific alcohol consumption and incident hypertension by considering the effect of sex and race.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Articles were identified in PubMed and Embase databases with no restriction on publication date. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by random effects models. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. This study involved 22 articles (31 studies) and included 414,477 participants. The hypertension risk was different among liquor, wine, and beer at 5.1-10 g/d of ethanol consumption (P-across subgroups = 0.002). The hypertension risk differed between men (RR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.20) and women (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.06) at 10 g/d (P-across subgroups = 0.005). We found a linear alcohol-hypertension association among white (P-linearity = 0.017), black people (P-linearity = 0.035), and Asians (P-linearity<0.001). With 10 g/d increment of consumption, the RRs for hypertension were 1.06 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08), 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.28), and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.10) for Asians, black, and white people, respectively.

CONCLUSION

Sex modifies the alcohol-hypertension association at low level of alcohol consumption and we did not find evidence of a protective effect of alcohol consumption among women. Black people may have higher hypertension risk than Asians and white people at the same ethanol consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Guangdong Key Laboratory for Genome Stability & Disease Prevention, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Yantian Entry-exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Clinical Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Clinical Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Guangdong Key Laboratory for Genome Stability & Disease Prevention, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: zhangming@szu.edu.cn.Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; The Third Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China; Guangdong Key Laboratory for Genome Stability & Disease Prevention, Shenzhen University Health Science Center, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: hud@szu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32446870

Citation

Liu, Feiyan, et al. "Race- and Sex-specific Association Between Alcohol Consumption and Hypertension in 22 Cohort Studies: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 30, no. 8, 2020, pp. 1249-1259.
Liu F, Liu Y, Sun X, et al. Race- and sex-specific association between alcohol consumption and hypertension in 22 cohort studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2020;30(8):1249-1259.
Liu, F., Liu, Y., Sun, X., Yin, Z., Li, H., Deng, K., Zhao, Y., Wang, B., Ren, Y., Liu, X., Zhang, D., Chen, X., Cheng, C., Liu, L., Liu, D., Chen, G., Hong, S., Wang, C., Zhang, M., & Hu, D. (2020). Race- and sex-specific association between alcohol consumption and hypertension in 22 cohort studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 30(8), 1249-1259. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2020.03.018
Liu F, et al. Race- and Sex-specific Association Between Alcohol Consumption and Hypertension in 22 Cohort Studies: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2020 07 24;30(8):1249-1259. PubMed PMID: 32446870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race- and sex-specific association between alcohol consumption and hypertension in 22 cohort studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Liu,Feiyan, AU - Liu,Yu, AU - Sun,Xizhuo, AU - Yin,Zhaoxia, AU - Li,Honghui, AU - Deng,Kunpeng, AU - Zhao,Yang, AU - Wang,Bingyuan, AU - Ren,Yongcheng, AU - Liu,Xuejiao, AU - Zhang,Dongdong, AU - Chen,Xu, AU - Cheng,Cheng, AU - Liu,Leilei, AU - Liu,Dechen, AU - Chen,Guozhen, AU - Hong,Shihao, AU - Wang,Chongjian, AU - Zhang,Ming, AU - Hu,Dongsheng, Y1 - 2020/03/27/ PY - 2019/10/09/received PY - 2020/03/08/revised PY - 2020/03/18/accepted PY - 2020/5/25/pubmed PY - 2020/11/11/medline PY - 2020/5/25/entrez KW - Alcohol KW - Dose–response KW - Gender KW - Hypertension KW - Meta-analysis KW - Race SP - 1249 EP - 1259 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 30 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The alcohol-hypertension relation has been well documented, but whether women have protective effect or race and type of beverage consumed affect the association remain unclear. To quantify the relation between total or beverage-specific alcohol consumption and incident hypertension by considering the effect of sex and race. METHODS AND RESULTS: Articles were identified in PubMed and Embase databases with no restriction on publication date. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by random effects models. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. This study involved 22 articles (31 studies) and included 414,477 participants. The hypertension risk was different among liquor, wine, and beer at 5.1-10 g/d of ethanol consumption (P-across subgroups = 0.002). The hypertension risk differed between men (RR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.20) and women (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.06) at 10 g/d (P-across subgroups = 0.005). We found a linear alcohol-hypertension association among white (P-linearity = 0.017), black people (P-linearity = 0.035), and Asians (P-linearity<0.001). With 10 g/d increment of consumption, the RRs for hypertension were 1.06 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08), 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.28), and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.10) for Asians, black, and white people, respectively. CONCLUSION: Sex modifies the alcohol-hypertension association at low level of alcohol consumption and we did not find evidence of a protective effect of alcohol consumption among women. Black people may have higher hypertension risk than Asians and white people at the same ethanol consumption. SN - 1590-3729 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32446870/Race__and_sex_specific_association_between_alcohol_consumption_and_hypertension_in_22_cohort_studies:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0939-4753(20)30100-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -