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Past and future decline of tropical pelagic biodiversity.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 06 09; 117(23):12891-12896.PN

Abstract

A major research question concerning global pelagic biodiversity remains unanswered: when did the apparent tropical biodiversity depression (i.e., bimodality of latitudinal diversity gradient [LDG]) begin? The bimodal LDG may be a consequence of recent ocean warming or of deep-time evolutionary speciation and extinction processes. Using rich fossil datasets of planktonic foraminifers, we show here that a unimodal (or only weakly bimodal) diversity gradient, with a plateau in the tropics, occurred during the last ice age and has since then developed into a bimodal gradient through species distribution shifts driven by postglacial ocean warming. The bimodal LDG likely emerged before the Anthropocene and industrialization, and perhaps ∼15,000 y ago, indicating a strong environmental control of tropical diversity even before the start of anthropogenic warming. However, our model projections suggest that future anthropogenic warming further diminishes tropical pelagic diversity to a level not seen in millions of years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Swire Institute of Marine Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China; moriakiyasuhara@gmail.com. School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, 106 Taipei, Taiwan.MARUM-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany. Faculty of Geosciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany.School of Environment, The University of Auckland, 1142 Auckland, New Zealand. Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture, Nord University, 8049 Bodø, Norway.Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2 Canada. United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, CB3 0DL Cambridge, United Kingdom.GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.Department of Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269.Department of Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269.Departamento de Zoología, Genética y Antropología Física, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. CRETUS Institute, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain.MARUM-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany. Faculty of Geosciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany.Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 903-0213 Okinawa, Japan.Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 903-0213 Okinawa, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32457146

Citation

Yasuhara, Moriaki, et al. "Past and Future Decline of Tropical Pelagic Biodiversity." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 117, no. 23, 2020, pp. 12891-12896.
Yasuhara M, Wei CL, Kucera M, et al. Past and future decline of tropical pelagic biodiversity. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020;117(23):12891-12896.
Yasuhara, M., Wei, C. L., Kucera, M., Costello, M. J., Tittensor, D. P., Kiessling, W., Bonebrake, T. C., Tabor, C. R., Feng, R., Baselga, A., Kretschmer, K., Kusumoto, B., & Kubota, Y. (2020). Past and future decline of tropical pelagic biodiversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 117(23), 12891-12896. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1916923117
Yasuhara M, et al. Past and Future Decline of Tropical Pelagic Biodiversity. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 06 9;117(23):12891-12896. PubMed PMID: 32457146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Past and future decline of tropical pelagic biodiversity. AU - Yasuhara,Moriaki, AU - Wei,Chih-Lin, AU - Kucera,Michal, AU - Costello,Mark J, AU - Tittensor,Derek P, AU - Kiessling,Wolfgang, AU - Bonebrake,Timothy C, AU - Tabor,Clay R, AU - Feng,Ran, AU - Baselga,Andrés, AU - Kretschmer,Kerstin, AU - Kusumoto,Buntarou, AU - Kubota,Yasuhiro, Y1 - 2020/05/26/ PY - 2020/5/28/pubmed PY - 2020/8/22/medline PY - 2020/5/28/entrez KW - Last Glacial Maximum KW - climate change KW - latitudinal diversity gradients KW - planktonic foraminifera KW - temperature SP - 12891 EP - 12896 JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America JO - Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A VL - 117 IS - 23 N2 - A major research question concerning global pelagic biodiversity remains unanswered: when did the apparent tropical biodiversity depression (i.e., bimodality of latitudinal diversity gradient [LDG]) begin? The bimodal LDG may be a consequence of recent ocean warming or of deep-time evolutionary speciation and extinction processes. Using rich fossil datasets of planktonic foraminifers, we show here that a unimodal (or only weakly bimodal) diversity gradient, with a plateau in the tropics, occurred during the last ice age and has since then developed into a bimodal gradient through species distribution shifts driven by postglacial ocean warming. The bimodal LDG likely emerged before the Anthropocene and industrialization, and perhaps ∼15,000 y ago, indicating a strong environmental control of tropical diversity even before the start of anthropogenic warming. However, our model projections suggest that future anthropogenic warming further diminishes tropical pelagic diversity to a level not seen in millions of years. SN - 1091-6490 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32457146/Past_and_future_decline_of_tropical_pelagic_biodiversity_ L2 - http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=32457146 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -