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Evaluating the use of posterior oropharyngeal saliva in a point-of-care assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2020 Dec; 9(1):1356-1359.EM

Abstract

During the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, logistic problems associated with specimen collection limited the SARS-CoV-2 testing, especially in the community. In this study, we assessed the use of posterior oropharyngeal saliva as specimens for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in an automated point-of-care molecular assay. Archived nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) and posterior oropharyngeal saliva specimens of 58 COVID-19 patients were tested with the Xpert® Xpress SARS-CoV-2 assay. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in either NPS or saliva specimens of all patients. Among them, 84.5% (49/58) tested positive in both NPS and saliva, 10.3% (6/58) tested positive in NPS only, and 5.2% (3/58) tested positive in saliva only. No significant difference in the detection rate was observed between NPS and saliva (McNemar's test p = 0.5078). The detection rate was slightly higher for N2 (NPS 94.8% and Saliva 93.1%) than that of the E gene target (Saliva: 89.7% vs 82.8%) on both specimen types. Significantly earlier median Ct value was observed for NPS comparing to that of saliva on both E (26.8 vs 29.7, p = 0.0002) and N2 gene target (29.3 vs 32.3, p = 0.0002). The median Ct value of E gene target was significantly earlier than that of the N2 gene target for both NPS (26.8 vs 29.3, p < 0.0001) and saliva (29.7 vs 32.3, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, posterior oropharyngeal saliva and NPS were found to have similar detection rates in the point-of-care test for SARS-CoV-2 detection. Since posterior oropharyngeal saliva can be collected easily, the use of saliva as an alternative specimen type for SARS-CoV-2 detection is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology, Carol Yu Centre for Infection, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. Infection Control Team, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong West Cluster, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.Department of Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology, Carol Yu Centre for Infection, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infection Control, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology, Carol Yu Centre for Infection, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infection Control, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China.Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology, Carol Yu Centre for Infection, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China. Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infection Control, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32459137

Citation

Chen, Jonathan Hon-Kwan, et al. "Evaluating the Use of Posterior Oropharyngeal Saliva in a Point-of-care Assay for the Detection of SARS-CoV-2." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 9, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1356-1359.
Chen JH, Yip CC, Poon RW, et al. Evaluating the use of posterior oropharyngeal saliva in a point-of-care assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2020;9(1):1356-1359.
Chen, J. H., Yip, C. C., Poon, R. W., Chan, K. H., Cheng, V. C., Hung, I. F., Chan, J. F., Yuen, K. Y., & To, K. K. (2020). Evaluating the use of posterior oropharyngeal saliva in a point-of-care assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 9(1), 1356-1359. https://doi.org/10.1080/22221751.2020.1775133
Chen JH, et al. Evaluating the Use of Posterior Oropharyngeal Saliva in a Point-of-care Assay for the Detection of SARS-CoV-2. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2020;9(1):1356-1359. PubMed PMID: 32459137.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the use of posterior oropharyngeal saliva in a point-of-care assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2. AU - Chen,Jonathan Hon-Kwan, AU - Yip,Cyril Chik-Yan, AU - Poon,Rosana Wing-Shan, AU - Chan,Kwok-Hung, AU - Cheng,Vincent Chi-Chung, AU - Hung,Ivan Fan-Ngai, AU - Chan,Jasper Fuk-Woo, AU - Yuen,Kwok-Yung, AU - To,Kelvin Kai-Wang, PY - 2020/5/28/pubmed PY - 2020/6/24/medline PY - 2020/5/28/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - nasopharyngeal swab KW - point-of-care testing KW - saliva SP - 1356 EP - 1359 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - During the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, logistic problems associated with specimen collection limited the SARS-CoV-2 testing, especially in the community. In this study, we assessed the use of posterior oropharyngeal saliva as specimens for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in an automated point-of-care molecular assay. Archived nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) and posterior oropharyngeal saliva specimens of 58 COVID-19 patients were tested with the Xpert® Xpress SARS-CoV-2 assay. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in either NPS or saliva specimens of all patients. Among them, 84.5% (49/58) tested positive in both NPS and saliva, 10.3% (6/58) tested positive in NPS only, and 5.2% (3/58) tested positive in saliva only. No significant difference in the detection rate was observed between NPS and saliva (McNemar's test p = 0.5078). The detection rate was slightly higher for N2 (NPS 94.8% and Saliva 93.1%) than that of the E gene target (Saliva: 89.7% vs 82.8%) on both specimen types. Significantly earlier median Ct value was observed for NPS comparing to that of saliva on both E (26.8 vs 29.7, p = 0.0002) and N2 gene target (29.3 vs 32.3, p = 0.0002). The median Ct value of E gene target was significantly earlier than that of the N2 gene target for both NPS (26.8 vs 29.3, p < 0.0001) and saliva (29.7 vs 32.3, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, posterior oropharyngeal saliva and NPS were found to have similar detection rates in the point-of-care test for SARS-CoV-2 detection. Since posterior oropharyngeal saliva can be collected easily, the use of saliva as an alternative specimen type for SARS-CoV-2 detection is recommended. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32459137/Evaluating_the_use_of_posterior_oropharyngeal_saliva_in_a_point_of_care_assay_for_the_detection_of_SARS_CoV_2_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/22221751.2020.1775133 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -