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Early Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an At-Home Setting.
J Prev Alzheimers Dis. 2020; 7(3):171-178.JP

Abstract

Emerging digital tools have the potential to enable a new generation of qualitative and quantitative assessment of cognitive performance. Moreover, the ubiquity of consumer electronics, such as smartphones and tablets, can be harnessed to support large-scale self-assessed cognitive screening with benefit to healthcare systems and consumers. A wide variety of apps, wearables, and new digital technologies are either available or in development for the detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a risk factor for dementia. Two categories of novel methodologies may be considered: passive technologies (which monitor a user's behavior without active user input) and interactive assessments (which require active user input). Such examinations can be self-administered, supervised by a caregiver, or conducted by an informant at home or outside of a clinical setting. These direct-to-consumer tools have the potential to sidestep barriers associated with cognitive evaluation in primary care, thus improving access to cognitive assessments. Although direct-to-consumer cognitive assessment is associated with its own barriers, including test validation, user experience, and technological concerns, it is conceivable that these issues can be addressed so that a large-scale, self-assessed cognitive evaluation that would represent an initial cognitive screen may be feasible in the future.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Marwan N. Sabbagh, Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Las Vegas, NV, USA, sabbagm@ccf.org; Tel.: (702) 483-6029; Fax: (702) 722-6584.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32463070

Citation

Sabbagh, M N., et al. "Early Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an At-Home Setting." The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 7, no. 3, 2020, pp. 171-178.
Sabbagh MN, Boada M, Borson S, et al. Early Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an At-Home Setting. J Prev Alzheimers Dis. 2020;7(3):171-178.
Sabbagh, M. N., Boada, M., Borson, S., Doraiswamy, P. M., Dubois, B., Ingram, J., Iwata, A., Porsteinsson, A. P., Possin, K. L., Rabinovici, G. D., Vellas, B., Chao, S., Vergallo, A., & Hampel, H. (2020). Early Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an At-Home Setting. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease, 7(3), 171-178. https://doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2020.22
Sabbagh MN, et al. Early Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an At-Home Setting. J Prev Alzheimers Dis. 2020;7(3):171-178. PubMed PMID: 32463070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in an At-Home Setting. AU - Sabbagh,M N, AU - Boada,M, AU - Borson,S, AU - Doraiswamy,P M, AU - Dubois,B, AU - Ingram,J, AU - Iwata,A, AU - Porsteinsson,A P, AU - Possin,K L, AU - Rabinovici,G D, AU - Vellas,B, AU - Chao,S, AU - Vergallo,A, AU - Hampel,H, PY - 2020/5/29/entrez KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - cognitive screening KW - digital consumer KW - mild cognitive impairment SP - 171 EP - 178 JF - The journal of prevention of Alzheimer's disease JO - J Prev Alzheimers Dis VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - Emerging digital tools have the potential to enable a new generation of qualitative and quantitative assessment of cognitive performance. Moreover, the ubiquity of consumer electronics, such as smartphones and tablets, can be harnessed to support large-scale self-assessed cognitive screening with benefit to healthcare systems and consumers. A wide variety of apps, wearables, and new digital technologies are either available or in development for the detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a risk factor for dementia. Two categories of novel methodologies may be considered: passive technologies (which monitor a user's behavior without active user input) and interactive assessments (which require active user input). Such examinations can be self-administered, supervised by a caregiver, or conducted by an informant at home or outside of a clinical setting. These direct-to-consumer tools have the potential to sidestep barriers associated with cognitive evaluation in primary care, thus improving access to cognitive assessments. Although direct-to-consumer cognitive assessment is associated with its own barriers, including test validation, user experience, and technological concerns, it is conceivable that these issues can be addressed so that a large-scale, self-assessed cognitive evaluation that would represent an initial cognitive screen may be feasible in the future. SN - 2426-0266 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32463070/Early_Detection_of_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_(MCI)_in_an_At-Home_Setting L2 - https://doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2020.22 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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