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The effect of donor type on outcomes in adults with acute myeloid leukemia after reduced-intensity hematopoietic peripheral blood cell transplant - a retrospective study.
Transpl Int. 2020 May 29 [Online ahead of print]TI

Abstract

We retrospectively analyzed outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HCT) from a peripheral blood (PB) source. We identified 46 haploidentical HCT (haplo), 59 matched unrelated donor HCT (MUD), and 40 matched related donor HCT (SIB) patients at a single institution. Haplo had improved overall survival (OS) when compared to MUD, HR 2.03 (P = 0.01) but not SIB, HR 1.17 (P = 0.61). There were no differences in relapse rates or treatment-related mortality (TRM). Haplo had higher rates of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grade II-IV at day 180 than MUD (44% vs. 25%, P = 0.03) and SIB (44% vs. 13% P < 0.01). Rates of acute GVHD III-IV and chronic GVHD were similar among the groups. Haplo had slower engraftment rates compared to MUD with neutrophil engraftment at 87% vs. 93%, (P < 0.01) and platelet engraftment at 59% vs. 86%, (P < 0.01) at 28 days. Although patients receiving haplo had higher acute GVHD II-IV and slower engraftment, they did not have increased TRM. These data may suggest that patients receiving haplo have improved OS compared to MUD for AML patients receiving RIC transplants. This should be confirmed using a larger cohort.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Barnes Jewish Hospital/Washington University, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Department of Internal Medicine, Barnes Jewish Hospital/Washington University, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.Department of Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.Division of Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32468720

Citation

Rashid, Nahid, et al. "The Effect of Donor Type On Outcomes in Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Reduced-intensity Hematopoietic Peripheral Blood Cell Transplant - a Retrospective Study." Transplant International : Official Journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation, 2020.
Rashid N, Slade M, Abboud R, et al. The effect of donor type on outcomes in adults with acute myeloid leukemia after reduced-intensity hematopoietic peripheral blood cell transplant - a retrospective study. Transpl Int. 2020.
Rashid, N., Slade, M., Abboud, R., Gao, F., DiPersio, J. F., Westervelt, P., Uy, G., Stockerl-Goldstein, K., Romee, R., & Schroeder, M. A. (2020). The effect of donor type on outcomes in adults with acute myeloid leukemia after reduced-intensity hematopoietic peripheral blood cell transplant - a retrospective study. Transplant International : Official Journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation. https://doi.org/10.1111/tri.13659
Rashid N, et al. The Effect of Donor Type On Outcomes in Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Reduced-intensity Hematopoietic Peripheral Blood Cell Transplant - a Retrospective Study. Transpl Int. 2020 May 29; PubMed PMID: 32468720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of donor type on outcomes in adults with acute myeloid leukemia after reduced-intensity hematopoietic peripheral blood cell transplant - a retrospective study. AU - Rashid,Nahid, AU - Slade,Michael, AU - Abboud,Ramzi, AU - Gao,Feng, AU - DiPersio,John F, AU - Westervelt,Peter, AU - Uy,Geoffrey, AU - Stockerl-Goldstein,Keith, AU - Romee,Rizwan, AU - Schroeder,Mark A, Y1 - 2020/05/29/ PY - 2020/03/20/received PY - 2020/04/15/revised PY - 2020/05/19/accepted PY - 2020/5/30/pubmed PY - 2020/5/30/medline PY - 2020/5/30/entrez KW - bone marrow transplantation KW - haploidentical KW - mobilized peripheral blood KW - reduced intensity conditioning JF - Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation JO - Transpl. Int. N2 - We retrospectively analyzed outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HCT) from a peripheral blood (PB) source. We identified 46 haploidentical HCT (haplo), 59 matched unrelated donor HCT (MUD), and 40 matched related donor HCT (SIB) patients at a single institution. Haplo had improved overall survival (OS) when compared to MUD, HR 2.03 (P = 0.01) but not SIB, HR 1.17 (P = 0.61). There were no differences in relapse rates or treatment-related mortality (TRM). Haplo had higher rates of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grade II-IV at day 180 than MUD (44% vs. 25%, P = 0.03) and SIB (44% vs. 13% P < 0.01). Rates of acute GVHD III-IV and chronic GVHD were similar among the groups. Haplo had slower engraftment rates compared to MUD with neutrophil engraftment at 87% vs. 93%, (P < 0.01) and platelet engraftment at 59% vs. 86%, (P < 0.01) at 28 days. Although patients receiving haplo had higher acute GVHD II-IV and slower engraftment, they did not have increased TRM. These data may suggest that patients receiving haplo have improved OS compared to MUD for AML patients receiving RIC transplants. This should be confirmed using a larger cohort. SN - 1432-2277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32468720/The_Effect_of_Donor_Type_on_Outcomes_in_Adults_with_Acute_Myeloid_Leukemia_after_Reduced_Intensity_Hematopoietic_Peripheral_Blood_Cell_Transplant L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/tri.13659 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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