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First evidence of microplastics bioaccumulation by marine organisms in the Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands.
Mar Pollut Bull. 2020 Jun; 155:111163.MP

Abstract

Microplastic (MP) pollution has become a global concern. We aim to quantify the extent of MP pollution in the coastal ecosystem of the Port Blair Bay, A&N Islands. Water, sediment, zooplankton, finfish, and shellfish samples were collected from the Port Blair Bay and analyzed for the presence of MP. Average concentrations of MP in water, sediment, zooplankton, finfish, and shellfishes were found to be 0.93 ± 0.59 particles per m3, 45.17 ± 25.23 particles per kilogram, 0.12 ± 0.07 pieces per zooplankter and 10.65 ± 7.83 particles per specimen, respectively. High amount of MP retention was observed in the zooplankton community. Maximum MP ingestion was observed in adult Carangoides malabaricus. Fiber was most abundant in water, sediment, and fish samples, followed by fragment and pellet. However, fragments were predominant in zooplankton. Nylon, acrylic, and ionomer surlyn were most abundant polymer types in the bay environment. These results demand further attention to combat plastic pollution in the coastal ecosystem.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Atal Centre for Ocean Science and Technology for Islands, National Institute of Ocean Technology, Port Blair 744103, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Electronic address: prasun.goswami@gmail.com.Atal Centre for Ocean Science and Technology for Islands, National Institute of Ocean Technology, Port Blair 744103, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Electronic address: vinithkumar.niot@gov.in.Ocean Science and Technology for Islands, National Institute of Ocean Technology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, Chennai 600100, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32469778

Citation

Goswami, Prasun, et al. "First Evidence of Microplastics Bioaccumulation By Marine Organisms in the Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands." Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 155, 2020, p. 111163.
Goswami P, Vinithkumar NV, Dharani G. First evidence of microplastics bioaccumulation by marine organisms in the Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands. Mar Pollut Bull. 2020;155:111163.
Goswami, P., Vinithkumar, N. V., & Dharani, G. (2020). First evidence of microplastics bioaccumulation by marine organisms in the Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 155, 111163. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111163
Goswami P, Vinithkumar NV, Dharani G. First Evidence of Microplastics Bioaccumulation By Marine Organisms in the Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands. Mar Pollut Bull. 2020;155:111163. PubMed PMID: 32469778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - First evidence of microplastics bioaccumulation by marine organisms in the Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands. AU - Goswami,Prasun, AU - Vinithkumar,Nambali Valsalan, AU - Dharani,Gopal, Y1 - 2020/04/25/ PY - 2020/01/13/received PY - 2020/04/08/revised PY - 2020/04/08/accepted PY - 2020/5/30/entrez PY - 2020/5/30/pubmed PY - 2020/7/11/medline KW - Finfish and shellfish KW - Ingestion KW - Microplastic KW - Sediment KW - Water KW - Zooplankton SP - 111163 EP - 111163 JF - Marine pollution bulletin JO - Mar. Pollut. Bull. VL - 155 N2 - Microplastic (MP) pollution has become a global concern. We aim to quantify the extent of MP pollution in the coastal ecosystem of the Port Blair Bay, A&N Islands. Water, sediment, zooplankton, finfish, and shellfish samples were collected from the Port Blair Bay and analyzed for the presence of MP. Average concentrations of MP in water, sediment, zooplankton, finfish, and shellfishes were found to be 0.93 ± 0.59 particles per m3, 45.17 ± 25.23 particles per kilogram, 0.12 ± 0.07 pieces per zooplankter and 10.65 ± 7.83 particles per specimen, respectively. High amount of MP retention was observed in the zooplankton community. Maximum MP ingestion was observed in adult Carangoides malabaricus. Fiber was most abundant in water, sediment, and fish samples, followed by fragment and pellet. However, fragments were predominant in zooplankton. Nylon, acrylic, and ionomer surlyn were most abundant polymer types in the bay environment. These results demand further attention to combat plastic pollution in the coastal ecosystem. SN - 1879-3363 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32469778/First_evidence_of_microplastics_bioaccumulation_by_marine_organisms_in_the_Port_Blair_Bay,_Andaman_Islands L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0025-326X(20)30281-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -