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High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging protocols in the diagnosis of fibrotic interstitial lung disease: overview for "non-radiologists".
Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis. 2017; 34(4):300-306.SV

Abstract

Fibrotic interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) include a number of pulmonary disorders characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells in lung parenchyma and fibrosis resulting in decreased lung compliance. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) represents the most common ILD. ILDs can be divided in two anatomo-pathological and radiographic patterns: usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP). The different radiological features of UIP and NSIP are discussed. The American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society, the Japanese Respiratory Society, and the Latin American Thoracic Association guidelines for the diagnosis and management of IPF have identified several characteristic high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features of UIP. However, even if these guidelines recommend to avoid surgical lung biopsy in case of confident UIP diagnosis on HRCT, they present some limitations, the most important of which is represented by interobserver agreement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be considered as a radiation-free alternative to HRCT for several lung diseases. However, the clinical value of MRI for IPF diagnosis remains to be proven. (Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis 2017; 34: 300-306).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32476862

Citation

Sergiacomi, Gianluigi, et al. "High-resolution Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocols in the Diagnosis of Fibrotic Interstitial Lung Disease: Overview for "non-radiologists"." Sarcoidosis, Vasculitis, and Diffuse Lung Diseases : Official Journal of WASOG, vol. 34, no. 4, 2017, pp. 300-306.
Sergiacomi G, Pugliese L, Ricci F, et al. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging protocols in the diagnosis of fibrotic interstitial lung disease: overview for "non-radiologists". Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis. 2017;34(4):300-306.
Sergiacomi, G., Pugliese, L., Ricci, F., Floris, R., & Fusco, A. (2017). High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging protocols in the diagnosis of fibrotic interstitial lung disease: overview for "non-radiologists". Sarcoidosis, Vasculitis, and Diffuse Lung Diseases : Official Journal of WASOG, 34(4), 300-306. https://doi.org/10.36141/svdld.v34i4.5792
Sergiacomi G, et al. High-resolution Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocols in the Diagnosis of Fibrotic Interstitial Lung Disease: Overview for "non-radiologists". Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis. 2017;34(4):300-306. PubMed PMID: 32476862.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging protocols in the diagnosis of fibrotic interstitial lung disease: overview for "non-radiologists". AU - Sergiacomi,Gianluigi, AU - Pugliese,Luca, AU - Ricci,Francesca, AU - Floris,Roberto, AU - Fusco,Armando, Y1 - 2017/04/28/ PY - 2016/09/30/received PY - 2017/08/10/accepted PY - 2020/6/2/entrez PY - 2017/1/1/pubmed PY - 2017/1/1/medline KW - fibrotic interstitial lung diseases KW - high-resolution computed tomography KW - idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis KW - magnetic resonance imaging SP - 300 EP - 306 JF - Sarcoidosis, vasculitis, and diffuse lung diseases : official journal of WASOG JO - Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis VL - 34 IS - 4 N2 - Fibrotic interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) include a number of pulmonary disorders characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells in lung parenchyma and fibrosis resulting in decreased lung compliance. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) represents the most common ILD. ILDs can be divided in two anatomo-pathological and radiographic patterns: usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP). The different radiological features of UIP and NSIP are discussed. The American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society, the Japanese Respiratory Society, and the Latin American Thoracic Association guidelines for the diagnosis and management of IPF have identified several characteristic high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features of UIP. However, even if these guidelines recommend to avoid surgical lung biopsy in case of confident UIP diagnosis on HRCT, they present some limitations, the most important of which is represented by interobserver agreement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be considered as a radiation-free alternative to HRCT for several lung diseases. However, the clinical value of MRI for IPF diagnosis remains to be proven. (Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis 2017; 34: 300-306). SN - 2532-179X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32476862/High_resolution_computed_tomography_and_magnetic_resonance_imaging_protocols_in_the_diagnosis_of_fibrotic_interstitial_lung_disease:_overview_for_"non_radiologists"_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/32476862/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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