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Seasonal influenza vaccination for children with special risk medical conditions: Does policy meet practice?
J Paediatr Child Health. 2020 Sep; 56(9):1388-1395.JP

Abstract

AIM

Ensuring children with special risk medical conditions (SRMC) are protected from influenza is important. The study objective was to describe influenza vaccination practices of medical professionals caring for children with SRMC and explore characteristics associated with a vaccine recommendation.

METHODS

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS

Treating paediatric specialists and general practitioners of children with confirmed SRMCs. Postal questionnaire administered from March to September 2018 (option for online response). Characteristics associated with providing a recommendation were explored using univariable and multivariable analyses.

RESULTS

Overall response rate of 24.8% with the sample representative of the eligible population in terms of practice location and years practicing medicine. There was a higher response from females and sub-specialists. Of the 198 completed survey responders, 97.8% were aware of the recommendation, yet only 38.4% reported they 'always' routinely recommended influenza vaccine and fewer (19.5%) were very confident in understanding all 'medically at risk' conditions. Medical professionals were more likely to provide a recommendation always or mostly, if they received annual influenza vaccination themselves (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.96, confidence interval (CI) 1.12-14.03), had confidence in understanding all 'medically at risk' conditions (aOR 1.82, CI 1.04-3.17) and perceived ownership of the responsibility to provide the recommendation (aOR 7.35, CI 1.67-32.26). Regional practising medical professionals were less likely to provide a recommendation (aOR 0.25 CI 0.10-0.70).

CONCLUSIONS

We need to improve medical professionals' knowledge through reminders and access to consistent and concise information about what constitutes a SRMC. Increasing medical professionals' engagement in the influenza vaccination programme could also provide a sense of responsibility fostering provider endorsement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Paediatrics, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne and Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Department of General Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Discipline of Paediatrics, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Vaccinology and Immunology Research Trials Unit, Womens and Childrens Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32479705

Citation

Tuckerman, Jane, et al. "Seasonal Influenza Vaccination for Children With Special Risk Medical Conditions: Does Policy Meet Practice?" Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol. 56, no. 9, 2020, pp. 1388-1395.
Tuckerman J, Crawford NW, Marshall HS. Seasonal influenza vaccination for children with special risk medical conditions: Does policy meet practice? J Paediatr Child Health. 2020;56(9):1388-1395.
Tuckerman, J., Crawford, N. W., & Marshall, H. S. (2020). Seasonal influenza vaccination for children with special risk medical conditions: Does policy meet practice? Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 56(9), 1388-1395. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14943
Tuckerman J, Crawford NW, Marshall HS. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination for Children With Special Risk Medical Conditions: Does Policy Meet Practice. J Paediatr Child Health. 2020;56(9):1388-1395. PubMed PMID: 32479705.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seasonal influenza vaccination for children with special risk medical conditions: Does policy meet practice? AU - Tuckerman,Jane, AU - Crawford,Nigel W, AU - Marshall,Helen S, Y1 - 2020/06/01/ PY - 2019/11/07/received PY - 2020/03/12/revised PY - 2020/03/16/accepted PY - 2020/6/2/pubmed PY - 2021/5/15/medline PY - 2020/6/2/entrez KW - immunisation KW - infectious disease KW - influenza SP - 1388 EP - 1395 JF - Journal of paediatrics and child health JO - J Paediatr Child Health VL - 56 IS - 9 N2 - AIM: Ensuring children with special risk medical conditions (SRMC) are protected from influenza is important. The study objective was to describe influenza vaccination practices of medical professionals caring for children with SRMC and explore characteristics associated with a vaccine recommendation. METHODS: Design: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Treating paediatric specialists and general practitioners of children with confirmed SRMCs. Postal questionnaire administered from March to September 2018 (option for online response). Characteristics associated with providing a recommendation were explored using univariable and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: Overall response rate of 24.8% with the sample representative of the eligible population in terms of practice location and years practicing medicine. There was a higher response from females and sub-specialists. Of the 198 completed survey responders, 97.8% were aware of the recommendation, yet only 38.4% reported they 'always' routinely recommended influenza vaccine and fewer (19.5%) were very confident in understanding all 'medically at risk' conditions. Medical professionals were more likely to provide a recommendation always or mostly, if they received annual influenza vaccination themselves (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.96, confidence interval (CI) 1.12-14.03), had confidence in understanding all 'medically at risk' conditions (aOR 1.82, CI 1.04-3.17) and perceived ownership of the responsibility to provide the recommendation (aOR 7.35, CI 1.67-32.26). Regional practising medical professionals were less likely to provide a recommendation (aOR 0.25 CI 0.10-0.70). CONCLUSIONS: We need to improve medical professionals' knowledge through reminders and access to consistent and concise information about what constitutes a SRMC. Increasing medical professionals' engagement in the influenza vaccination programme could also provide a sense of responsibility fostering provider endorsement. SN - 1440-1754 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32479705/Seasonal_influenza_vaccination_for_children_with_special_risk_medical_conditions:_Does_policy_meet_practice L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14943 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -