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Azure-winged magpies fail to understand the principle of mirror imaging.
Behav Processes. 2020 Aug; 177:104155.BP

Abstract

Mirror self-recognition (MSR) is considered a crucial step in the emergence of self-cognition. The MSR paradigm has become a standard method for evaluating self-cognition in several species. For example, Eurasian magpies and Indian house crows have passed the mark test for self-cognition, whereas efforts to find MSR in other corvid species have failed. However, no literature has conducted MSR tests on azure-winged magpies, a species of corvids. Therefore, the current research aimed to investigate the MSR behaviours of azure-winged magpies upon looking into a mirror for the first time. The study included four tests: (1) mirror preference and standardised mirror exploration, (2) single vertical mirror test, (3) mark test and (4) mirror-triggered search test. The azure-winged magpies displayed immense curiosity towards the mirror and their images in the mirror in Test 1&2. In the subsequent mark tests, they failed to recognise themselves in the mirror and regarded their images as conspecifics. Behaviour analysis showed no significant difference between marked and unmarked behaviours. Finally they seemed to infer the presence of bait from the image in the mirror, but were found to fail to understand that the location of the bait in the mirror was the same as that in the real world. For a better insight into the MSR behaviour of azure-winged magpies, research studies involving prolonged mirror exposure and training are recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China.Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China.Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China.Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China.Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China.Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China.Lab of Animal Behavior & Conservation, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210023, China. Electronic address: lizq@nju.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32485232

Citation

Wang, Lin, et al. "Azure-winged Magpies Fail to Understand the Principle of Mirror Imaging." Behavioural Processes, vol. 177, 2020, p. 104155.
Wang L, Luo Y, Wang H, et al. Azure-winged magpies fail to understand the principle of mirror imaging. Behav Processes. 2020;177:104155.
Wang, L., Luo, Y., Wang, H., Zou, Y., Yao, H., Ullah, S., & Li, Z. (2020). Azure-winged magpies fail to understand the principle of mirror imaging. Behavioural Processes, 177, 104155. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2020.104155
Wang L, et al. Azure-winged Magpies Fail to Understand the Principle of Mirror Imaging. Behav Processes. 2020;177:104155. PubMed PMID: 32485232.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Azure-winged magpies fail to understand the principle of mirror imaging. AU - Wang,Lin, AU - Luo,Yunchao, AU - Wang,Han, AU - Zou,Yibiao, AU - Yao,Hanqi, AU - Ullah,Sana, AU - Li,Zhongqiu, Y1 - 2020/05/30/ PY - 2019/09/13/received PY - 2020/05/05/revised PY - 2020/05/28/accepted PY - 2020/6/3/pubmed PY - 2020/6/3/medline PY - 2020/6/3/entrez KW - Azure-winged magpies KW - Mirror self-recognition (MSR) KW - Mirror test KW - Social behaviour SP - 104155 EP - 104155 JF - Behavioural processes JO - Behav. Processes VL - 177 N2 - Mirror self-recognition (MSR) is considered a crucial step in the emergence of self-cognition. The MSR paradigm has become a standard method for evaluating self-cognition in several species. For example, Eurasian magpies and Indian house crows have passed the mark test for self-cognition, whereas efforts to find MSR in other corvid species have failed. However, no literature has conducted MSR tests on azure-winged magpies, a species of corvids. Therefore, the current research aimed to investigate the MSR behaviours of azure-winged magpies upon looking into a mirror for the first time. The study included four tests: (1) mirror preference and standardised mirror exploration, (2) single vertical mirror test, (3) mark test and (4) mirror-triggered search test. The azure-winged magpies displayed immense curiosity towards the mirror and their images in the mirror in Test 1&2. In the subsequent mark tests, they failed to recognise themselves in the mirror and regarded their images as conspecifics. Behaviour analysis showed no significant difference between marked and unmarked behaviours. Finally they seemed to infer the presence of bait from the image in the mirror, but were found to fail to understand that the location of the bait in the mirror was the same as that in the real world. For a better insight into the MSR behaviour of azure-winged magpies, research studies involving prolonged mirror exposure and training are recommended. SN - 1872-8308 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32485232/Azure-winged_magpies_fail_to_understand_the_principle_of_mirror_imaging L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-6357(19)30396-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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