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Association of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels with biomarkers of placental development and disease during mid-gestation.
Environ Health. 2020 Jun 03; 19(1):61.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) exposures have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. A hypothesized mechanism is via alterations in placental development and function. However, we lack biomarkers that can be used as early indicators of maternal/fetal response to PBDE exposures and/or perturbations in placental development or function.

METHODS

To evaluate the relationship between PBDE levels and placental biomarkers during mid-gestation of human pregnancy (n = 62), we immunolocalized three molecules that play key roles in cytotrophoblast (CTB) differentiation and interstitial/endovascular uterine invasion-integrin alpha-1 (ITGA1), vascular endothelial-cadherin (CDH5), and metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1)-and assessed three morphological parameters as potential indicators of pathological alterations using H&E-stained tissues-leukocyte infiltration, fibrinoid deposition, and CTB endovascular invasion. We evaluated associations between placental PBDE levels and of biomarkers of placental development and disease using censored Kendall's tau correlation and linear regression methods.

RESULTS

PBDEs were detected in all placental samples. We observed substantial variation in antigen expression and morphological endpoints across placental regions. We observed an association between PBDE concentrations and immunoreactivity of endovascular CTB staining with anti-ITGA1 (inverse) or interstitial CTBs staining with anti-CDH5 (positive).

CONCLUSIONS

We found several molecular markers that may be sensitive placental indicators of PBDE exposure. Further, this indicates that placental biomarkers of development and disease could be useful barometers of exposure to PBDEs, a paradigm that could be extended to other environmental chemicals and placental stage-specific antigens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, Mailstop 0132, 550 16th Street, 7th Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA. julia.varshavsky@ucsf.edu.Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, Mailstop 0132, 550 16th Street, 7th Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA. Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA. Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 550 16th Street, 7th Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 66 North Pauline St, Memphis, TN, 38163, USA.California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control, Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, 700 Heinz Ave # 200, Berkeley, CA, 94710, USA.California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control, Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, 700 Heinz Ave # 200, Berkeley, CA, 94710, USA.California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control, Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, 700 Heinz Ave # 200, Berkeley, CA, 94710, USA.Center for Reproductive Sciences and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, UCSF Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, Mailstop 0132, 550 16th Street, 7th Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32493340

Citation

Varshavsky, Julia R., et al. "Association of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Levels With Biomarkers of Placental Development and Disease During Mid-gestation." Environmental Health : a Global Access Science Source, vol. 19, no. 1, 2020, p. 61.
Varshavsky JR, Robinson JF, Zhou Y, et al. Association of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels with biomarkers of placental development and disease during mid-gestation. Environ Health. 2020;19(1):61.
Varshavsky, J. R., Robinson, J. F., Zhou, Y., Puckett, K. A., Kwan, E., Buarpung, S., Aburajab, R., Gaw, S. L., Sen, S., Smith, S. C., Frankenfield, J., Park, J. S., Fisher, S. J., & Woodruff, T. J. (2020). Association of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels with biomarkers of placental development and disease during mid-gestation. Environmental Health : a Global Access Science Source, 19(1), 61. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12940-020-00617-7
Varshavsky JR, et al. Association of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Levels With Biomarkers of Placental Development and Disease During Mid-gestation. Environ Health. 2020 Jun 3;19(1):61. PubMed PMID: 32493340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels with biomarkers of placental development and disease during mid-gestation. AU - Varshavsky,Julia R, AU - Robinson,Joshua F, AU - Zhou,Yan, AU - Puckett,Kenisha A, AU - Kwan,Elaine, AU - Buarpung,Sirirak, AU - Aburajab,Rayyan, AU - Gaw,Stephanie L, AU - Sen,Saunak, AU - Smith,Sabrina Crispo, AU - Frankenfield,Julie, AU - Park,June-Soo, AU - Fisher,Susan J, AU - Woodruff,Tracey J, Y1 - 2020/06/03/ PY - 2019/12/10/received PY - 2020/05/21/accepted PY - 2020/6/5/entrez PY - 2020/6/5/pubmed PY - 2020/6/5/medline KW - Biomonitoring KW - Birth outcomes KW - Cytotrophoblast differentiation KW - Developmental/reproductive health effects KW - Endocrine disruption KW - Flame retardants KW - Maternal health KW - Preeclampsia KW - Pregnancy complications SP - 61 EP - 61 JF - Environmental health : a global access science source JO - Environ Health VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) exposures have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. A hypothesized mechanism is via alterations in placental development and function. However, we lack biomarkers that can be used as early indicators of maternal/fetal response to PBDE exposures and/or perturbations in placental development or function. METHODS: To evaluate the relationship between PBDE levels and placental biomarkers during mid-gestation of human pregnancy (n = 62), we immunolocalized three molecules that play key roles in cytotrophoblast (CTB) differentiation and interstitial/endovascular uterine invasion-integrin alpha-1 (ITGA1), vascular endothelial-cadherin (CDH5), and metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1)-and assessed three morphological parameters as potential indicators of pathological alterations using H&E-stained tissues-leukocyte infiltration, fibrinoid deposition, and CTB endovascular invasion. We evaluated associations between placental PBDE levels and of biomarkers of placental development and disease using censored Kendall's tau correlation and linear regression methods. RESULTS: PBDEs were detected in all placental samples. We observed substantial variation in antigen expression and morphological endpoints across placental regions. We observed an association between PBDE concentrations and immunoreactivity of endovascular CTB staining with anti-ITGA1 (inverse) or interstitial CTBs staining with anti-CDH5 (positive). CONCLUSIONS: We found several molecular markers that may be sensitive placental indicators of PBDE exposure. Further, this indicates that placental biomarkers of development and disease could be useful barometers of exposure to PBDEs, a paradigm that could be extended to other environmental chemicals and placental stage-specific antigens. SN - 1476-069X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32493340/Association_of_polybrominated_diphenyl_ether_(PBDE)_levels_with_biomarkers_of_placental_development_and_disease_during_mid-gestation L2 - https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-020-00617-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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