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Retrospective analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in Suzhou, China from 2009 to 2014.
Virus Genes. 2020 Jun 04 [Online ahead of print]VG

Abstract

In this study, we investigated drug resistance levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected patients in Suzhou by retrospectively analyzing this property and the characteristics of circulating HIV-1 strains collected from 2009 to 2014. A total of 261 HIV-1-positive plasma samples, confirmed by the Suzhou CDC, were collected and evaluated to detect HIV-1 drug resistance genotypes using an in-house method. The pol gene fragment was amplified, and its nucleic acid sequence was determined by Sanger sequencing. Drug resistance mutations were then analyzed using the Stanford University HIV resistance database (https://hivdb.stanford.edu). A total of 216 pol gene fragments were amplified and sequenced with 16.7% (36/216) of sequences revealing these mutations. The drug resistance rates of protease, nucleoside reverse transcriptase, and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were 4/36 (11.1%), 2/36 (5.6%), and 30/36 (83.3%), respectively. Five surveillance drug resistance mutations were found in 36 sequences, of which, three were found among specimens of men who have sex with men. Potential low-level resistance accounted for 33% of amino acid mutations associated with NNRTIs. Two of the mutations, M230L and L100I, which confer a high level of resistance efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP) used as NNRTIs for first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), were detected in this study. Therefore, when HIV-1 patients in Suzhou are administered fist-line ART, much attention should be paid to the status of these mutations that cause resistance to EVP, EFV, and NVP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Clinical Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Clinic Bldg, Rm 201, 899 Pinghai Road, Suzhou, 215031, China. syh430071@163.com.The Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.Center of Clinical Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Clinic Bldg, Rm 201, 899 Pinghai Road, Suzhou, 215031, China.The Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.Center of Clinical Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Clinic Bldg, Rm 201, 899 Pinghai Road, Suzhou, 215031, China.Center of Clinical Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Clinic Bldg, Rm 201, 899 Pinghai Road, Suzhou, 215031, China.Center of Clinical Laboratory, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow University, Clinic Bldg, Rm 201, 899 Pinghai Road, Suzhou, 215031, China.Suzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Suzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32500372

Citation

Song, Yanhui, et al. "Retrospective Analysis of HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations in Suzhou, China From 2009 to 2014." Virus Genes, 2020.
Song Y, Hu J, He J, et al. Retrospective analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in Suzhou, China from 2009 to 2014. Virus Genes. 2020.
Song, Y., Hu, J., He, J., Dong, C., Yuan, Y., Li, Y., Li, R., & Ya, X. (2020). Retrospective analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in Suzhou, China from 2009 to 2014. Virus Genes. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11262-020-01774-0
Song Y, et al. Retrospective Analysis of HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations in Suzhou, China From 2009 to 2014. Virus Genes. 2020 Jun 4; PubMed PMID: 32500372.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Retrospective analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in Suzhou, China from 2009 to 2014. AU - Song,Yanhui, AU - Hu,Jingping, AU - He,Jun, AU - Dong,Chunsheng, AU - Yuan,Ying, AU - Li,Yuan, AU - Li,Ronghua, AU - Ya,Xuerong, Y1 - 2020/06/04/ PY - 2020/03/04/received PY - 2020/05/27/accepted PY - 2020/6/6/entrez KW - Antiretroviral therapy KW - China KW - Drug resistance mutation KW - Epidemiology KW - HIV-1 JF - Virus genes JO - Virus Genes N2 - In this study, we investigated drug resistance levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected patients in Suzhou by retrospectively analyzing this property and the characteristics of circulating HIV-1 strains collected from 2009 to 2014. A total of 261 HIV-1-positive plasma samples, confirmed by the Suzhou CDC, were collected and evaluated to detect HIV-1 drug resistance genotypes using an in-house method. The pol gene fragment was amplified, and its nucleic acid sequence was determined by Sanger sequencing. Drug resistance mutations were then analyzed using the Stanford University HIV resistance database (https://hivdb.stanford.edu). A total of 216 pol gene fragments were amplified and sequenced with 16.7% (36/216) of sequences revealing these mutations. The drug resistance rates of protease, nucleoside reverse transcriptase, and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were 4/36 (11.1%), 2/36 (5.6%), and 30/36 (83.3%), respectively. Five surveillance drug resistance mutations were found in 36 sequences, of which, three were found among specimens of men who have sex with men. Potential low-level resistance accounted for 33% of amino acid mutations associated with NNRTIs. Two of the mutations, M230L and L100I, which confer a high level of resistance efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP) used as NNRTIs for first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), were detected in this study. Therefore, when HIV-1 patients in Suzhou are administered fist-line ART, much attention should be paid to the status of these mutations that cause resistance to EVP, EFV, and NVP. SN - 1572-994X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32500372/Retrospective_analysis_of_HIV-1_drug_resistance_mutations_in_Suzhou,_China_from_2009_to_2014 L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11262-020-01774-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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