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Effects and recovery of larvae of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Desmophyllum pertusum) exposed to suspended bentonite, barite and drill cuttings.
Mar Environ Res. 2020 Jun; 158:104996.ME

Abstract

Fossil fuel drilling operations create sediment plumes and release waste materials into the ocean. These operations sometimes occur close to sensitive marine ecosystems, such as cold-water corals. While there have been several studies on the effects of energy industry activities on adult corals, there is very little information on potential impacts to their early life history stages. Larval stages of many marine organisms, including cold-water corals use cilia as a means of feeding and swimming, and if these structures become clogged with suspended particulates, the larvae may sink and be lost to the system. The objective of this study was to understand the response of Lophelia pertusa larvae to a different drilling waste components, and assess post-exposure recovery. Larvae of two ages (eight and 21 days) were exposed to a range of concentrations of bentonite, barite and drill cuttings. Larval sensitivity was assessed using the concentration at which 50% of the larvae showed behavioral effects (EC50) or lethal effects (LC50). Larvae showed greatest sensitivity to bentonite, followed by barite and drill cuttings, and also showed age-related responses that differed among the test materials. Post exposure recovery was variable across materials, with larvae exposed to bentonite having the lowest recovery rates. Understanding the vulnerability of early life history stages to human activities can help inform management strategies to preserve reproductive capacity of important marine ecosystems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, P.O. Box 5685 Torgarden, 7485, Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: johanna.jarnegren@nina.no.Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab, 3618 Costal Highway 98 St, Teresa, FL, 32358, USA. Electronic address: sbrooke@fsu.edu.Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics, Dept. of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: henrik.jensen@ntnu.no.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32501265

Citation

Järnegren, Johanna, et al. "Effects and Recovery of Larvae of the Cold-water Coral Lophelia Pertusa (Desmophyllum Pertusum) Exposed to Suspended Bentonite, Barite and Drill Cuttings." Marine Environmental Research, vol. 158, 2020, p. 104996.
Järnegren J, Brooke S, Jensen H. Effects and recovery of larvae of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Desmophyllum pertusum) exposed to suspended bentonite, barite and drill cuttings. Mar Environ Res. 2020;158:104996.
Järnegren, J., Brooke, S., & Jensen, H. (2020). Effects and recovery of larvae of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Desmophyllum pertusum) exposed to suspended bentonite, barite and drill cuttings. Marine Environmental Research, 158, 104996. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2020.104996
Järnegren J, Brooke S, Jensen H. Effects and Recovery of Larvae of the Cold-water Coral Lophelia Pertusa (Desmophyllum Pertusum) Exposed to Suspended Bentonite, Barite and Drill Cuttings. Mar Environ Res. 2020;158:104996. PubMed PMID: 32501265.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects and recovery of larvae of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Desmophyllum pertusum) exposed to suspended bentonite, barite and drill cuttings. AU - Järnegren,Johanna, AU - Brooke,Sandra, AU - Jensen,Henrik, Y1 - 2020/04/24/ PY - 2019/11/27/received PY - 2020/04/10/revised PY - 2020/04/15/accepted PY - 2020/6/6/entrez PY - 2020/6/6/pubmed PY - 2020/6/6/medline KW - Anthropogenic impact KW - Cold-water coral KW - Desmophyllum pertusum KW - Drilling KW - Larvae KW - Lophelia pertusa KW - Recovery KW - Suspended particles KW - Toxicity SP - 104996 EP - 104996 JF - Marine environmental research JO - Mar. Environ. Res. VL - 158 N2 - Fossil fuel drilling operations create sediment plumes and release waste materials into the ocean. These operations sometimes occur close to sensitive marine ecosystems, such as cold-water corals. While there have been several studies on the effects of energy industry activities on adult corals, there is very little information on potential impacts to their early life history stages. Larval stages of many marine organisms, including cold-water corals use cilia as a means of feeding and swimming, and if these structures become clogged with suspended particulates, the larvae may sink and be lost to the system. The objective of this study was to understand the response of Lophelia pertusa larvae to a different drilling waste components, and assess post-exposure recovery. Larvae of two ages (eight and 21 days) were exposed to a range of concentrations of bentonite, barite and drill cuttings. Larval sensitivity was assessed using the concentration at which 50% of the larvae showed behavioral effects (EC50) or lethal effects (LC50). Larvae showed greatest sensitivity to bentonite, followed by barite and drill cuttings, and also showed age-related responses that differed among the test materials. Post exposure recovery was variable across materials, with larvae exposed to bentonite having the lowest recovery rates. Understanding the vulnerability of early life history stages to human activities can help inform management strategies to preserve reproductive capacity of important marine ecosystems. SN - 1879-0291 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32501265/Effects_and_recovery_of_larvae_of_the_cold_water_coral_Lophelia_pertusa__Desmophyllum_pertusum__exposed_to_suspended_bentonite_barite_and_drill_cuttings_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0141-1136(19)30791-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -