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Phylogenetic relationships of Strongyloides species in carnivore hosts.
Parasitol Int. 2020 Oct; 78:102151.PI

Abstract

Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasitic nematode and a major pathogen responsible for human strongyloidiasis. The presence of this species in the dog population has led to an interest in studying the phylogenetic relationships among Strongyloides spp. in carnivore hosts. In the present study, Strongyloides spp. from various carnivore hosts (raccoon, Japanese badger, Siberian weasel, raccoon dog, masked palm civet, and domestic cat) were sought. Except for civets, Strongyloides spp. were identified in all host species. Based on 18S rDNA sequences, nine OTUs (operational taxonomy units) were identified. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using 18S28S rDNA and mitochondrial cox1 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) sequences clustered them into two groups. The first group (named the stercoralis/procyonis group) was comprised of six OTUs and occurred in cats, raccoon dogs, raccoons (S. procyonis), Siberian weasels, and Japanese badgers and included S. stercoralis from humans and dogs. The second group (named the planiceps group) was made up of Strongyloides spp. from raccoon dogs (two OTUs) and one OTU from Siberian weasels. Subsequent analysis using almost the full-length nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes in their mitochondrial genomes placed Strongyloides spp. of cats in a sister taxon position to S. stercoralis, whereas S. procyonis from raccoons was more distantly related to them. The presence of Strongyloides spp. from various carnivore hosts, which are close relatives of S. stercoralis, suggests this group of Strongyloides (the stercoralis/procyonis group) essentially evolved as parasites of carnivores, although more data on Strongyloides spp. from primate hosts are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Parasitology, Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692, Japan; Department of Microbiology, University of Medicine 1, No. 245, Myoma Kyaung Street, Lanmadaw Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Electronic address: phoo-pwint-ko@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp.Hikiiwa Park Center, 1629 Inari-cho, Tanabe, Wakayama 646-0051, Japan. Electronic address: hikiiwa@mb.aikis.or.jp.Instituto de Medicina Tropical 'Alexander von Humboldt', Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Honorio Delgado 430, San Martin de Porres, Lima 15102, Peru. Electronic address: marco.canales@upch.pe.Department of Microbiology, University of Medicine 2, North Okkalapa Township, Yangon, Myanmar.Department of Microbiology, University of Medicine 1, No. 245, Myoma Kyaung Street, Lanmadaw Township, Yangon, Myanmar.Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitic Diseases, Department of Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-kibanadai-nishi, 889-2192 Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-kibanadai-nishi, 889-2192 Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address: kukuri@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp.Instituto de Medicina Tropical 'Alexander von Humboldt', Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Honorio Delgado 430, San Martin de Porres, Lima 15102, Peru. Electronic address: martin.montes@upch.pe.Division of Tumor and Cellular Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692, Japan. Electronic address: kmorishi@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp.Instituto de Medicina Tropical 'Alexander von Humboldt', Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Honorio Delgado 430, San Martin de Porres, Lima 15102, Peru. Electronic address: jose.gotuzzo@upch.pe.Division of Parasitology, Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen-kibanadai-nishi, 889-2192 Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address: hikomaru@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp.Division of Parasitology, Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692, Japan. Electronic address: enagayas@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32502520

Citation

Ko, Phoo Pwint, et al. "Phylogenetic Relationships of Strongyloides Species in Carnivore Hosts." Parasitology International, vol. 78, 2020, p. 102151.
Ko PP, Suzuki K, Canales-Ramos M, et al. Phylogenetic relationships of Strongyloides species in carnivore hosts. Parasitol Int. 2020;78:102151.
Ko, P. P., Suzuki, K., Canales-Ramos, M., Aung, M. P. P. T. H. H., Htike, W. W., Yoshida, A., Montes, M., Morishita, K., Gotuzzo, E., Maruyama, H., & Nagayasu, E. (2020). Phylogenetic relationships of Strongyloides species in carnivore hosts. Parasitology International, 78, 102151. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2020.102151
Ko PP, et al. Phylogenetic Relationships of Strongyloides Species in Carnivore Hosts. Parasitol Int. 2020;78:102151. PubMed PMID: 32502520.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phylogenetic relationships of Strongyloides species in carnivore hosts. AU - Ko,Phoo Pwint, AU - Suzuki,Kazuo, AU - Canales-Ramos,Marco, AU - Aung,Myo Pa Pa Thet Hnin Htwe, AU - Htike,Wah Win, AU - Yoshida,Ayako, AU - Montes,Martin, AU - Morishita,Kazuhiro, AU - Gotuzzo,Eduardo, AU - Maruyama,Haruhiko, AU - Nagayasu,Eiji, Y1 - 2020/06/03/ PY - 2020/04/14/received PY - 2020/05/27/revised PY - 2020/05/27/accepted PY - 2020/6/6/pubmed PY - 2020/6/6/medline PY - 2020/6/6/entrez KW - Evolution KW - Molecular phylogeny KW - Strongyloides SP - 102151 EP - 102151 JF - Parasitology international JO - Parasitol. Int. VL - 78 N2 - Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasitic nematode and a major pathogen responsible for human strongyloidiasis. The presence of this species in the dog population has led to an interest in studying the phylogenetic relationships among Strongyloides spp. in carnivore hosts. In the present study, Strongyloides spp. from various carnivore hosts (raccoon, Japanese badger, Siberian weasel, raccoon dog, masked palm civet, and domestic cat) were sought. Except for civets, Strongyloides spp. were identified in all host species. Based on 18S rDNA sequences, nine OTUs (operational taxonomy units) were identified. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using 18S28S rDNA and mitochondrial cox1 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) sequences clustered them into two groups. The first group (named the stercoralis/procyonis group) was comprised of six OTUs and occurred in cats, raccoon dogs, raccoons (S. procyonis), Siberian weasels, and Japanese badgers and included S. stercoralis from humans and dogs. The second group (named the planiceps group) was made up of Strongyloides spp. from raccoon dogs (two OTUs) and one OTU from Siberian weasels. Subsequent analysis using almost the full-length nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes in their mitochondrial genomes placed Strongyloides spp. of cats in a sister taxon position to S. stercoralis, whereas S. procyonis from raccoons was more distantly related to them. The presence of Strongyloides spp. from various carnivore hosts, which are close relatives of S. stercoralis, suggests this group of Strongyloides (the stercoralis/procyonis group) essentially evolved as parasites of carnivores, although more data on Strongyloides spp. from primate hosts are needed. SN - 1873-0329 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32502520/Phylogenetic_relationships_of_Strongyloides_species_in_carnivore_hosts L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1383-5769(20)30101-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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