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Community-based door to door census of suspected people living with epilepsy: empowering community drug distributors to improve the provision of care to rural communities in Cameroon.
BMC Public Health. 2020 Jun 05; 20(1):871.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epilepsy is a severe neurological disorder with huge psychological, social, and economic consequences, including premature deaths and loss of productivity. Sub-Saharan Africa carries the highest burden of epilepsy. The management of epilepsy in Cameroon remains unsatisfactory due to poor identification of cases and a limited knowledge of the distribution of the disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether community drug distributors (CDDs) - volunteers selected by their communities to distribute ivermectin against onchocerciasis and who have been proven efficient to deliver other health interventions such as insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent malaria, vitamin A tablets, and albendazole to treat soil transmitted helminthiasis - can be used to reliably identify people living with epilepsy to promote better management of cases.

METHODS

This study was carried out in three health Districts in Cameroon. An exhaustive house to house census was carried out by trained CDDs under the supervision of local nurses. In each household, all suspected cases of epilepsy were identified. In each health district, five communities were randomly selected for a second census by trained health personnel (research team). The results of the two censuses were compared for verification purposes.

RESULTS

A total of 53,005 people was registered in the 190 communities surveyed with 794 (1.4%) individuals identified as suspected cases of epilepsy (SCE) by the CDDs. In the 15 communities where the SCE census was verified, the average ratio between the number of suspected cases of epilepsy reported in a community by the research team and that reported by the CDDs was 1.1; this ratio was < 0.8 and > 1.2 in 6 communities.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study suggest that CDDs, who are present in about 200,000 communities in 31 Sub Saharan African countries where onchocerciasis is endemic, can be successfully used to assess epilepsy prevalence, and therefore map epilepsy in many African countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Research on Filariasis and other Tropical Diseases (CRFilMT), P.O. Box 5797, Yaoundé, Cameroon. kamgno@crfilmt.org. Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. kamgno@crfilmt.org.Centre for Research on Filariasis and other Tropical Diseases (CRFilMT), P.O. Box 5797, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Service d'épidémiologie, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Membre du Réseau International des Instituts Pasteur, Yaoundé, Cameroon.Centre for Research on Filariasis and other Tropical Diseases (CRFilMT), P.O. Box 5797, Yaoundé, Cameroon.Centre for Research on Filariasis and other Tropical Diseases (CRFilMT), P.O. Box 5797, Yaoundé, Cameroon.Expanded Special Project for Elimination of NTDs (ESPEN), World Health Organization, African Regional Office, Brazzaville, Republic of Congo.Filarial Programmes Support Unit (FPSU), Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place Liverpool, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), UMI233/ INSERM U1175/ Université de Montpellier, 911 Avenue Agropolis, 34394, Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32503495

Citation

Kamgno, Joseph, et al. "Community-based Door to Door Census of Suspected People Living With Epilepsy: Empowering Community Drug Distributors to Improve the Provision of Care to Rural Communities in Cameroon." BMC Public Health, vol. 20, no. 1, 2020, p. 871.
Kamgno J, Tchatchueng-Mbougua JB, Nana-Djeunga HC, et al. Community-based door to door census of suspected people living with epilepsy: empowering community drug distributors to improve the provision of care to rural communities in Cameroon. BMC Public Health. 2020;20(1):871.
Kamgno, J., Tchatchueng-Mbougua, J. B., Nana-Djeunga, H. C., Esso, L., Zouré, H. G., Mackenzie, C. D., & Boussinesq, M. (2020). Community-based door to door census of suspected people living with epilepsy: empowering community drug distributors to improve the provision of care to rural communities in Cameroon. BMC Public Health, 20(1), 871. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-08997-8
Kamgno J, et al. Community-based Door to Door Census of Suspected People Living With Epilepsy: Empowering Community Drug Distributors to Improve the Provision of Care to Rural Communities in Cameroon. BMC Public Health. 2020 Jun 5;20(1):871. PubMed PMID: 32503495.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Community-based door to door census of suspected people living with epilepsy: empowering community drug distributors to improve the provision of care to rural communities in Cameroon. AU - Kamgno,Joseph, AU - Tchatchueng-Mbougua,Jules B, AU - Nana-Djeunga,Hugues C, AU - Esso,Lynda, AU - Zouré,Honorat G, AU - Mackenzie,Charles D, AU - Boussinesq,Michel, Y1 - 2020/06/05/ PY - 2019/09/12/received PY - 2020/05/27/accepted PY - 2020/6/7/entrez PY - 2020/6/7/pubmed PY - 2020/6/7/medline KW - Community drug distributors KW - Distribution KW - Epilepsy SP - 871 EP - 871 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is a severe neurological disorder with huge psychological, social, and economic consequences, including premature deaths and loss of productivity. Sub-Saharan Africa carries the highest burden of epilepsy. The management of epilepsy in Cameroon remains unsatisfactory due to poor identification of cases and a limited knowledge of the distribution of the disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether community drug distributors (CDDs) - volunteers selected by their communities to distribute ivermectin against onchocerciasis and who have been proven efficient to deliver other health interventions such as insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent malaria, vitamin A tablets, and albendazole to treat soil transmitted helminthiasis - can be used to reliably identify people living with epilepsy to promote better management of cases. METHODS: This study was carried out in three health Districts in Cameroon. An exhaustive house to house census was carried out by trained CDDs under the supervision of local nurses. In each household, all suspected cases of epilepsy were identified. In each health district, five communities were randomly selected for a second census by trained health personnel (research team). The results of the two censuses were compared for verification purposes. RESULTS: A total of 53,005 people was registered in the 190 communities surveyed with 794 (1.4%) individuals identified as suspected cases of epilepsy (SCE) by the CDDs. In the 15 communities where the SCE census was verified, the average ratio between the number of suspected cases of epilepsy reported in a community by the research team and that reported by the CDDs was 1.1; this ratio was < 0.8 and > 1.2 in 6 communities. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that CDDs, who are present in about 200,000 communities in 31 Sub Saharan African countries where onchocerciasis is endemic, can be successfully used to assess epilepsy prevalence, and therefore map epilepsy in many African countries. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32503495/Community-based_door_to_door_census_of_suspected_people_living_with_epilepsy:_empowering_community_drug_distributors_to_improve_the_provision_of_care_to_rural_communities_in_Cameroon L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-020-08997-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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