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Characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK: national population based cohort study.
BMJ. 2020 06 08; 369:m2107.BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe a national cohort of pregnant women admitted to hospital with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the UK, identify factors associated with infection, and describe outcomes, including transmission of infection, for mothers and infants.

DESIGN

Prospective national population based cohort study using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS).

SETTING

All 194 obstetric units in the UK.

PARTICIPANTS

427 pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between 1 March 2020 and 14 April 2020.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Incidence of maternal hospital admission and infant infection. Rates of maternal death, level 3 critical care unit admission, fetal loss, caesarean birth, preterm birth, stillbirth, early neonatal death, and neonatal unit admission.

RESULTS

The estimated incidence of admission to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy was 4.9 (95% confidence interval 4.5 to 5.4) per 1000 maternities. 233 (56%) pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were from black or other ethnic minority groups, 281 (69%) were overweight or obese, 175 (41%) were aged 35 or over, and 145 (34%) had pre-existing comorbidities. 266 (62%) women gave birth or had a pregnancy loss; 196 (73%) gave birth at term. Forty one (10%) women admitted to hospital needed respiratory support, and five (1%) women died. Twelve (5%) of 265 infants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, six of them within the first 12 hours after birth.

CONCLUSIONS

Most pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection were in the late second or third trimester, supporting guidance for continued social distancing measures in later pregnancy. Most had good outcomes, and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to infants was uncommon. The high proportion of women from black or minority ethnic groups admitted with infection needs urgent investigation and explanation.

STUDY REGISTRATION

ISRCTN 40092247.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK marian.knight@npeu.ox.ac.uk.National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK.Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK.Department of Women's and Children's Health, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.Neonatal Medicine, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.Institute for Women's Health, University College London, London, UK.National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK.Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32513659

Citation

Knight, Marian, et al. "Characteristics and Outcomes of Pregnant Women Admitted to Hospital With Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 Infection in UK: National Population Based Cohort Study." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 369, 2020, pp. m2107.
Knight M, Bunch K, Vousden N, et al. Characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK: national population based cohort study. BMJ. 2020;369:m2107.
Knight, M., Bunch, K., Vousden, N., Morris, E., Simpson, N., Gale, C., O'Brien, P., Quigley, M., Brocklehurst, P., & Kurinczuk, J. J. (2020). Characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK: national population based cohort study. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 369, m2107. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m2107
Knight M, et al. Characteristics and Outcomes of Pregnant Women Admitted to Hospital With Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 Infection in UK: National Population Based Cohort Study. BMJ. 2020 06 8;369:m2107. PubMed PMID: 32513659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characteristics and outcomes of pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK: national population based cohort study. AU - Knight,Marian, AU - Bunch,Kathryn, AU - Vousden,Nicola, AU - Morris,Edward, AU - Simpson,Nigel, AU - Gale,Chris, AU - O'Brien,Patrick, AU - Quigley,Maria, AU - Brocklehurst,Peter, AU - Kurinczuk,Jennifer J, AU - ,, Y1 - 2020/06/08/ PY - 2020/6/10/entrez PY - 2020/6/10/pubmed PY - 2020/6/24/medline SP - m2107 EP - m2107 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 369 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe a national cohort of pregnant women admitted to hospital with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the UK, identify factors associated with infection, and describe outcomes, including transmission of infection, for mothers and infants. DESIGN: Prospective national population based cohort study using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS). SETTING: All 194 obstetric units in the UK. PARTICIPANTS: 427 pregnant women admitted to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between 1 March 2020 and 14 April 2020. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of maternal hospital admission and infant infection. Rates of maternal death, level 3 critical care unit admission, fetal loss, caesarean birth, preterm birth, stillbirth, early neonatal death, and neonatal unit admission. RESULTS: The estimated incidence of admission to hospital with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy was 4.9 (95% confidence interval 4.5 to 5.4) per 1000 maternities. 233 (56%) pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy were from black or other ethnic minority groups, 281 (69%) were overweight or obese, 175 (41%) were aged 35 or over, and 145 (34%) had pre-existing comorbidities. 266 (62%) women gave birth or had a pregnancy loss; 196 (73%) gave birth at term. Forty one (10%) women admitted to hospital needed respiratory support, and five (1%) women died. Twelve (5%) of 265 infants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, six of them within the first 12 hours after birth. CONCLUSIONS: Most pregnant women admitted to hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection were in the late second or third trimester, supporting guidance for continued social distancing measures in later pregnancy. Most had good outcomes, and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 to infants was uncommon. The high proportion of women from black or minority ethnic groups admitted with infection needs urgent investigation and explanation. STUDY REGISTRATION: ISRCTN 40092247. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32513659/Characteristics_and_outcomes_of_pregnant_women_admitted_to_hospital_with_confirmed_SARS_CoV_2_infection_in_UK:_national_population_based_cohort_study_ L2 - http://www.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=32513659 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -