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Will healthcare workers improve infection prevention and control behaviors as COVID-19 risk emerges and increases, in China?
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2020 06 11; 9(1):83.AR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

COVID-19 arise global attention since their first public reporting. Infection prevention and control (IPC) is critical to combat COVID-19, especially at the early stage of pandemic outbreak. This study aimed to measure level of healthcare workers' (HCW') self-reported IPC behaviors with the risk of COVID-19 emerges and increases.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was conducted in two tertiary hospitals. A structured self-administered questionnaire was delivered to HCWs in selected hospitals. The dependent variables were self-reported IPC behavior compliance; and independent variables were outbreak risk and three intent of infection risk (risk of contact with suspected patients, high-risk department, risk of affected area). Chi-square tests and multivariable negative binomial regression models were employed.

RESULTS

A total of 1386 participants were surveyed. The risk of outbreak increased self-reported IPC behavior on each item (coefficient varied from 0.029 to 0.151). Considering different extent of risk, HCWs from high-risk department had better self-reported practice in most IPC behavior (coefficient ranged from 0.027 to 0.149). HCWs in risk-affected area had higher self-reported compliance in several IPC behavior (coefficient ranged from 0.028 to 0.113). However, HCWs contacting with suspected patients had lower self-reported compliance in several IPC behavior (coefficient varied from - 0.159 to - 0.087).

CONCLUSIONS

With the risk of COVID-19 emerges, HCWs improve IPC behaviors comprehensively, which benefits for better combat COVID-19. With the risk (high-risk department and affected area) further increases, majority of IPC behaviors achieved improvement. Nevertheless, under the risk of contact with suspected patients, HCWs show worse IPC behaviors. Which may result from higher work load and insufficient supplies and resources among these HCWs. The preparedness system should be improved and medical assistance is urgently needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.First Affiliated Hospital of Gannan Medical University, Ganzhou, China.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. xpzhang602@hust.edu.cn.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. zq_hust@126.com.Present address: School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical School, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13 Hangkong Rd, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. chenhao@hust.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32527300

Citation

Lai, Xiaoquan, et al. "Will Healthcare Workers Improve Infection Prevention and Control Behaviors as COVID-19 Risk Emerges and Increases, in China?" Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, vol. 9, no. 1, 2020, p. 83.
Lai X, Wang X, Yang Q, et al. Will healthcare workers improve infection prevention and control behaviors as COVID-19 risk emerges and increases, in China? Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2020;9(1):83.
Lai, X., Wang, X., Yang, Q., Xu, X., Tang, Y., Liu, C., Tan, L., Lai, R., Wang, H., Zhang, X., Zhou, Q., & Chen, H. (2020). Will healthcare workers improve infection prevention and control behaviors as COVID-19 risk emerges and increases, in China? Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, 9(1), 83. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13756-020-00746-1
Lai X, et al. Will Healthcare Workers Improve Infection Prevention and Control Behaviors as COVID-19 Risk Emerges and Increases, in China. Antimicrob Resist Infect Control. 2020 06 11;9(1):83. PubMed PMID: 32527300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Will healthcare workers improve infection prevention and control behaviors as COVID-19 risk emerges and increases, in China? AU - Lai,Xiaoquan, AU - Wang,Xuemei, AU - Yang,Qiuxia, AU - Xu,Xiaojun, AU - Tang,Yuqing, AU - Liu,Chenxi, AU - Tan,Li, AU - Lai,Ruying, AU - Wang,He, AU - Zhang,Xinping, AU - Zhou,Qian, AU - Chen,Hao, Y1 - 2020/06/11/ PY - 2020/02/18/received PY - 2020/06/01/accepted PY - 2020/6/13/entrez PY - 2020/6/13/pubmed PY - 2020/6/24/medline KW - Affected area KW - COVID-19 KW - Contact with confirmed and suspected patients KW - High-risk department KW - Infection prevention and control behaviors KW - Outbreak risk SP - 83 EP - 83 JF - Antimicrobial resistance and infection control JO - Antimicrob Resist Infect Control VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: COVID-19 arise global attention since their first public reporting. Infection prevention and control (IPC) is critical to combat COVID-19, especially at the early stage of pandemic outbreak. This study aimed to measure level of healthcare workers' (HCW') self-reported IPC behaviors with the risk of COVID-19 emerges and increases. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two tertiary hospitals. A structured self-administered questionnaire was delivered to HCWs in selected hospitals. The dependent variables were self-reported IPC behavior compliance; and independent variables were outbreak risk and three intent of infection risk (risk of contact with suspected patients, high-risk department, risk of affected area). Chi-square tests and multivariable negative binomial regression models were employed. RESULTS: A total of 1386 participants were surveyed. The risk of outbreak increased self-reported IPC behavior on each item (coefficient varied from 0.029 to 0.151). Considering different extent of risk, HCWs from high-risk department had better self-reported practice in most IPC behavior (coefficient ranged from 0.027 to 0.149). HCWs in risk-affected area had higher self-reported compliance in several IPC behavior (coefficient ranged from 0.028 to 0.113). However, HCWs contacting with suspected patients had lower self-reported compliance in several IPC behavior (coefficient varied from - 0.159 to - 0.087). CONCLUSIONS: With the risk of COVID-19 emerges, HCWs improve IPC behaviors comprehensively, which benefits for better combat COVID-19. With the risk (high-risk department and affected area) further increases, majority of IPC behaviors achieved improvement. Nevertheless, under the risk of contact with suspected patients, HCWs show worse IPC behaviors. Which may result from higher work load and insufficient supplies and resources among these HCWs. The preparedness system should be improved and medical assistance is urgently needed. SN - 2047-2994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32527300/Will_healthcare_workers_improve_infection_prevention_and_control_behaviors_as_COVID_19_risk_emerges_and_increases_in_China L2 - https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13756-020-00746-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -