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Extracellular vesicles in infectious diseases caused by protozoan parasites in buffaloes.
J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis. 2020; 26:e20190067.JV

Abstract

Background

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-bound vesicles of growing interest in vetetinary parasitology. The aim of the present report was to provide the first isolation, quantification and protein characterization of EVs from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) sera infected with Theileria spp.

Methods

Infected animals were identified through optical microscopy and PCR. EVs were isolated from buffalo sera by size-exclusion chromatography and characterized using western blotting analysis, nanoparticle tracking analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Subsequently, the proteins from isolated vesicles were characterized by mass spectrometry.

Results

EVs from buffalo sera have shown sizes in the 124-140 nm range and 306 proteins were characterized. The protein-protein interaction analysis has evidenced biological processes and molecular function associated with signal transduction, binding, regulation of metabolic processes, transport, catalytic activity and response to acute stress. Five proteins have been shown to be differentially expressed between the control group and that infected with Theileria spp., all acting in the oxidative stress pathway.

Conclusions

EVs from buffaloes infected with Theileria spp. were successfully isolated and characterized. This is an advance in the knowledge of host-parasite relationship that contributes to the understanding of host immune response and theileriosis evasion mechanisms. These findings may pave the way for searching new EVs candidate-markers for a better production of safe biological products derived from buffaloes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate Program in Tropical Diseases, Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil.Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, SP, Brazil.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil.Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil.Adolfo Lutz Institute, Center of Regional Laboratories II, Bauru, SP, Brazil.Paulista Agency of Agribusiness Technology (APTA), Bauru, SP, Brazil.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.ERA Chair Team (VetMedZg), Clinic for Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom, UK.Graduate Program in Tropical Diseases, Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Graduate Program in Clinical Research, Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Center for the Study of Venoms and Venomous Animals (CEVAP), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil.Graduate Program in Tropical Diseases, Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Graduate Program in Clinical Research, Botucatu Medical School (FMB), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Center for the Study of Venoms and Venomous Animals (CEVAP), São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32528536

Citation

de Pontes, Leticia Gomes, et al. "Extracellular Vesicles in Infectious Diseases Caused By Protozoan Parasites in Buffaloes." The Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins Including Tropical Diseases, vol. 26, 2020, pp. e20190067.
de Pontes LG, Altei WF, Galan A, et al. Extracellular vesicles in infectious diseases caused by protozoan parasites in buffaloes. J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis. 2020;26:e20190067.
de Pontes, L. G., Altei, W. F., Galan, A., Bilić, P., Guillemin, N., Kuleš, J., Horvatić, A., Ribeiro, L. N. M., de Paula, E., Pereira, V. B. R., Lucheis, S. B., Mrljak, V., Eckersall, P. D., Ferreira, R. S., & Dos Santos, L. D. (2020). Extracellular vesicles in infectious diseases caused by protozoan parasites in buffaloes. The Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins Including Tropical Diseases, 26, e20190067. https://doi.org/10.1590/1678-9199-JVATITD-2019-0067
de Pontes LG, et al. Extracellular Vesicles in Infectious Diseases Caused By Protozoan Parasites in Buffaloes. J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis. 2020;26:e20190067. PubMed PMID: 32528536.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extracellular vesicles in infectious diseases caused by protozoan parasites in buffaloes. AU - de Pontes,Leticia Gomes, AU - Altei,Wanessa Fernanda, AU - Galan,Asier, AU - Bilić,Petra, AU - Guillemin,Nicolas, AU - Kuleš,Josipa, AU - Horvatić,Anita, AU - Ribeiro,Lígia Nunes de Morais, AU - de Paula,Eneida, AU - Pereira,Virgínia Bodelão Richini, AU - Lucheis,Simone Baldini, AU - Mrljak,Vladimir, AU - Eckersall,Peter David, AU - Ferreira,Rui Seabra,Jr AU - Dos Santos,Lucilene Delazari, Y1 - 2020/05/29/ PY - 2019/09/11/received PY - 2020/05/01/accepted PY - 2020/6/13/entrez PY - 2020/6/13/pubmed PY - 2020/6/13/medline KW - Extracellular vesicles KW - Nanoparticle tracking analysis KW - Proteomic analysis KW - Protozoan parasites KW - Theileria spp. SP - e20190067 EP - e20190067 JF - The journal of venomous animals and toxins including tropical diseases JO - J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis VL - 26 N2 - Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-bound vesicles of growing interest in vetetinary parasitology. The aim of the present report was to provide the first isolation, quantification and protein characterization of EVs from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) sera infected with Theileria spp. Methods: Infected animals were identified through optical microscopy and PCR. EVs were isolated from buffalo sera by size-exclusion chromatography and characterized using western blotting analysis, nanoparticle tracking analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Subsequently, the proteins from isolated vesicles were characterized by mass spectrometry. Results: EVs from buffalo sera have shown sizes in the 124-140 nm range and 306 proteins were characterized. The protein-protein interaction analysis has evidenced biological processes and molecular function associated with signal transduction, binding, regulation of metabolic processes, transport, catalytic activity and response to acute stress. Five proteins have been shown to be differentially expressed between the control group and that infected with Theileria spp., all acting in the oxidative stress pathway. Conclusions: EVs from buffaloes infected with Theileria spp. were successfully isolated and characterized. This is an advance in the knowledge of host-parasite relationship that contributes to the understanding of host immune response and theileriosis evasion mechanisms. These findings may pave the way for searching new EVs candidate-markers for a better production of safe biological products derived from buffaloes. SN - 1678-9199 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32528536/Extracellular_vesicles_in_infectious_diseases_caused_by_protozoan_parasites_in_buffaloes DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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