Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Serological differentiation between COVID-19 and SARS infections.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2020 Dec; 9(1):1497-1505.EM

Abstract

In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by SARS-CoV-2, multiple diagnostic tests are required for acute disease diagnosis, contact tracing, monitoring asymptomatic infection rates and assessing herd immunity. While PCR remains the frontline test of choice in the acute diagnostic setting, serological tests are urgently needed. Unlike PCR tests which are highly specific, cross-reactivity is a major challenge for COVID-19 antibody tests considering there are six other coronaviruses known to infect humans. SARS-CoV is genetically related to SARS-CoV-2 sharing approximately 80% sequence identity and both belong to the species SARS related coronavirus in the genus Betacoronavirus of family Coronaviridae. We developed and compared the performance of four different serological tests to comprehensively assess the cross-reactivity between COVID-19 and SARS patient sera. There is significant cross-reactivity when N protein of either virus is used. The S1 or RBD regions from the spike (S) protein offers better specificity. Amongst the different platforms, capture ELISA performed best. We found that SARS survivors all have significant levels of antibodies remaining in their blood 17 years after infection. Anti-N antibodies waned more than anti-RBD antibodies, and the latter is known to play a more important role in providing protective immunity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.National Centre for Infectious Diseases, Singapore, Singapore. Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.National Centre for Infectious Diseases, Singapore, Singapore. Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore, Singapore.National Centre for Infectious Diseases, Singapore, Singapore. Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore. Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32529906

Citation

Chia, Wan Ni, et al. "Serological Differentiation Between COVID-19 and SARS Infections." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 9, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1497-1505.
Chia WN, Tan CW, Foo R, et al. Serological differentiation between COVID-19 and SARS infections. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2020;9(1):1497-1505.
Chia, W. N., Tan, C. W., Foo, R., Kang, A. E. Z., Peng, Y., Sivalingam, V., Tiu, C., Ong, X. M., Zhu, F., Young, B. E., Chen, M. I., Tan, Y. J., Lye, D. C., Anderson, D. E., & Wang, L. F. (2020). Serological differentiation between COVID-19 and SARS infections. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 9(1), 1497-1505. https://doi.org/10.1080/22221751.2020.1780951
Chia WN, et al. Serological Differentiation Between COVID-19 and SARS Infections. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2020;9(1):1497-1505. PubMed PMID: 32529906.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serological differentiation between COVID-19 and SARS infections. AU - Chia,Wan Ni, AU - Tan,Chee Wah, AU - Foo,Randy, AU - Kang,Adrian Eng Zheng, AU - Peng,Yilong, AU - Sivalingam,Velraj, AU - Tiu,Charles, AU - Ong,Xin Mei, AU - Zhu,Feng, AU - Young,Barnaby E, AU - Chen,Mark I-C, AU - Tan,Yee-Joo, AU - Lye,David C, AU - Anderson,Danielle E, AU - Wang,Lin-Fa, PY - 2020/6/13/pubmed PY - 2020/7/14/medline PY - 2020/6/13/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - antibody KW - serology SP - 1497 EP - 1505 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by SARS-CoV-2, multiple diagnostic tests are required for acute disease diagnosis, contact tracing, monitoring asymptomatic infection rates and assessing herd immunity. While PCR remains the frontline test of choice in the acute diagnostic setting, serological tests are urgently needed. Unlike PCR tests which are highly specific, cross-reactivity is a major challenge for COVID-19 antibody tests considering there are six other coronaviruses known to infect humans. SARS-CoV is genetically related to SARS-CoV-2 sharing approximately 80% sequence identity and both belong to the species SARS related coronavirus in the genus Betacoronavirus of family Coronaviridae. We developed and compared the performance of four different serological tests to comprehensively assess the cross-reactivity between COVID-19 and SARS patient sera. There is significant cross-reactivity when N protein of either virus is used. The S1 or RBD regions from the spike (S) protein offers better specificity. Amongst the different platforms, capture ELISA performed best. We found that SARS survivors all have significant levels of antibodies remaining in their blood 17 years after infection. Anti-N antibodies waned more than anti-RBD antibodies, and the latter is known to play a more important role in providing protective immunity. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32529906/Serological_differentiation_between_COVID_19_and_SARS_infections_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/22221751.2020.1780951 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -