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Animal toxins - Nature's evolutionary-refined toolkit for basic research and drug discovery.
Biochem Pharmacol. 2020 Jun 12 [Online ahead of print]BP

Abstract

Venomous animals have evolved toxins that interfere with specific components of their victim's core physiological systems, thereby causing biological dysfunction that aids in prey capture, defense against predators, or other roles such as intraspecific competition. Many animal lineages evolved venom systems independently, highlighting the success of this strategy. Over the course of evolution, toxins with exceptional specificity and high potency for their intended molecular targets have prevailed, making venoms an invaluable and almost inexhaustible source of bioactive molecules, some of which have found use as pharmacological tools, human therapeutics, and bioinsecticides. Current biomedically-focused research on venoms is directed towards their use in delineating the physiological role of toxin molecular targets such as ion channels and receptors, studying or treating human diseases, targeting vectors of human diseases, and treating microbial and parasitic infections. We provide examples of each of these areas of venom research, highlighting the potential that venom molecules hold for basic research and drug development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Science & Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia; Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia. Electronic address: vherzig@usc.edu.au.Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia.Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia.Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia.Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia.Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia. Electronic address: glenn.king@imb.uq.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32535105

Citation

Herzig, Volker, et al. "Animal Toxins - Nature's Evolutionary-refined Toolkit for Basic Research and Drug Discovery." Biochemical Pharmacology, 2020, p. 114096.
Herzig V, Cristofori-Armstrong B, Israel MR, et al. Animal toxins - Nature's evolutionary-refined toolkit for basic research and drug discovery. Biochem Pharmacol. 2020.
Herzig, V., Cristofori-Armstrong, B., Israel, M. R., Nixon, S. A., Vetter, I., & King, G. F. (2020). Animal toxins - Nature's evolutionary-refined toolkit for basic research and drug discovery. Biochemical Pharmacology, 114096. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bcp.2020.114096
Herzig V, et al. Animal Toxins - Nature's Evolutionary-refined Toolkit for Basic Research and Drug Discovery. Biochem Pharmacol. 2020 Jun 12;114096. PubMed PMID: 32535105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Animal toxins - Nature's evolutionary-refined toolkit for basic research and drug discovery. AU - Herzig,Volker, AU - Cristofori-Armstrong,Ben, AU - Israel,Mathilde R, AU - Nixon,Samantha A, AU - Vetter,Irina, AU - King,Glenn F, Y1 - 2020/06/12/ PY - 2020/05/13/received PY - 2020/06/06/revised PY - 2020/06/09/accepted PY - 2020/6/15/pubmed PY - 2020/6/15/medline PY - 2020/6/15/entrez KW - Drug discovery KW - Insecticides KW - Pharmacological tools KW - Therapeutics KW - Venom KW - Venom peptides SP - 114096 EP - 114096 JF - Biochemical pharmacology JO - Biochem. Pharmacol. N2 - Venomous animals have evolved toxins that interfere with specific components of their victim's core physiological systems, thereby causing biological dysfunction that aids in prey capture, defense against predators, or other roles such as intraspecific competition. Many animal lineages evolved venom systems independently, highlighting the success of this strategy. Over the course of evolution, toxins with exceptional specificity and high potency for their intended molecular targets have prevailed, making venoms an invaluable and almost inexhaustible source of bioactive molecules, some of which have found use as pharmacological tools, human therapeutics, and bioinsecticides. Current biomedically-focused research on venoms is directed towards their use in delineating the physiological role of toxin molecular targets such as ion channels and receptors, studying or treating human diseases, targeting vectors of human diseases, and treating microbial and parasitic infections. We provide examples of each of these areas of venom research, highlighting the potential that venom molecules hold for basic research and drug development. SN - 1873-2968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32535105/Animal_toxins_-_Nature's_evolutionary-refined_toolkit_for_basic_research_and_drug_discovery L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-2952(20)30332-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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