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Dietary sugar inhibits satiation by decreasing the central processing of sweet taste.
Elife. 2020 06 16; 9E

Abstract

From humans to vinegar flies, exposure to diets rich in sugar and fat lowers taste sensation, changes food choices, and promotes feeding. However, how these peripheral alterations influence eating is unknown. Here we used the genetically tractable organism D. melanogaster to define the neural mechanisms through which this occurs. We characterized a population of protocerebral anterior medial dopaminergic neurons (PAM DANs) that innervates the β'2 compartment of the mushroom body and responds to sweet taste. In animals fed a high sugar diet, the response of PAM-β'2 to sweet stimuli was reduced and delayed, and sensitive to the strength of the signal transmission out of the sensory neurons. We found that PAM-β'2 DANs activity controls feeding rate and satiation: closed-loop optogenetic activation of β'2 DANs restored normal eating in animals fed high sucrose. These data argue that diet-dependent alterations in taste weaken satiation by impairing the central processing of sensory signals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Neuroscience Graduate Program, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States. Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.The Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.The Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.The Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.The Neuroscience Graduate Program, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States. Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States. The Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32539934

Citation

May, Christina E., et al. "Dietary Sugar Inhibits Satiation By Decreasing the Central Processing of Sweet Taste." ELife, vol. 9, 2020.
May CE, Rosander J, Gottfried J, et al. Dietary sugar inhibits satiation by decreasing the central processing of sweet taste. Elife. 2020;9.
May, C. E., Rosander, J., Gottfried, J., Dennis, E., & Dus, M. (2020). Dietary sugar inhibits satiation by decreasing the central processing of sweet taste. ELife, 9. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.54530
May CE, et al. Dietary Sugar Inhibits Satiation By Decreasing the Central Processing of Sweet Taste. Elife. 2020 06 16;9 PubMed PMID: 32539934.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary sugar inhibits satiation by decreasing the central processing of sweet taste. AU - May,Christina E, AU - Rosander,Julia, AU - Gottfried,Jennifer, AU - Dennis,Evan, AU - Dus,Monica, Y1 - 2020/06/16/ PY - 2019/12/17/received PY - 2020/05/13/accepted PY - 2020/6/17/entrez PY - 2020/6/17/pubmed PY - 2021/2/17/medline KW - D. melanogaster KW - dopamine KW - neuroscience KW - satiation KW - sugar diet KW - taste JF - eLife JO - Elife VL - 9 N2 - From humans to vinegar flies, exposure to diets rich in sugar and fat lowers taste sensation, changes food choices, and promotes feeding. However, how these peripheral alterations influence eating is unknown. Here we used the genetically tractable organism D. melanogaster to define the neural mechanisms through which this occurs. We characterized a population of protocerebral anterior medial dopaminergic neurons (PAM DANs) that innervates the β'2 compartment of the mushroom body and responds to sweet taste. In animals fed a high sugar diet, the response of PAM-β'2 to sweet stimuli was reduced and delayed, and sensitive to the strength of the signal transmission out of the sensory neurons. We found that PAM-β'2 DANs activity controls feeding rate and satiation: closed-loop optogenetic activation of β'2 DANs restored normal eating in animals fed high sucrose. These data argue that diet-dependent alterations in taste weaken satiation by impairing the central processing of sensory signals. SN - 2050-084X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32539934/Dietary_sugar_inhibits_satiation_by_decreasing_the_central_processing_of_sweet_taste_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.54530 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -