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Cryptogenic cerebral venous thrombosis in a multiple-sclerosis-patient treated with Alemtuzumab.
Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2020 May 30; 44:102246.MS

Abstract

Alemtuzumab is a highly effective treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Its molecular target is CD 52, a GPI-anchored protein. Herein, we describe the case of a 40-year-old man with MS treated with alemtuzumab, who developed cerebral sinus thrombosis. In the literature, alemtuzumab was associated with venous thrombosis, attributed to a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)-like mechanism. In our case, no PNH clones were detected. Other common causes of cerebral venous thrombosis, like infections and thrombophilia, were excluded, thus the pathogenic mechanism remains obscure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Regional Epilepsy Centre, Great Metropolitan Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Italy. Electronic address: s.gasparini@unicz.it.Regional Epilepsy Centre, Great Metropolitan Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy.Regional Epilepsy Centre, Great Metropolitan Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy.Regional Epilepsy Centre, Great Metropolitan Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Italy.Regional Epilepsy Centre, Great Metropolitan Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32540745

Citation

Gasparini, Sara, et al. "Cryptogenic Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in a Multiple-sclerosis-patient Treated With Alemtuzumab." Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, vol. 44, 2020, p. 102246.
Gasparini S, Russo M, Dattola V, et al. Cryptogenic cerebral venous thrombosis in a multiple-sclerosis-patient treated with Alemtuzumab. Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2020;44:102246.
Gasparini, S., Russo, M., Dattola, V., Ferlazzo, E., & Aguglia, U. (2020). Cryptogenic cerebral venous thrombosis in a multiple-sclerosis-patient treated with Alemtuzumab. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 44, 102246. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2020.102246
Gasparini S, et al. Cryptogenic Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in a Multiple-sclerosis-patient Treated With Alemtuzumab. Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2020 May 30;44:102246. PubMed PMID: 32540745.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cryptogenic cerebral venous thrombosis in a multiple-sclerosis-patient treated with Alemtuzumab. AU - Gasparini,Sara, AU - Russo,Margherita, AU - Dattola,Vincenzo, AU - Ferlazzo,Edoardo, AU - Aguglia,Umberto, Y1 - 2020/05/30/ PY - 2019/12/10/received PY - 2020/05/18/revised PY - 2020/05/26/accepted PY - 2020/6/17/pubmed PY - 2020/6/17/medline PY - 2020/6/17/entrez KW - Alemtuzumab KW - Cerebral venous thrombosis KW - PNH SP - 102246 EP - 102246 JF - Multiple sclerosis and related disorders JO - Mult Scler Relat Disord VL - 44 N2 - Alemtuzumab is a highly effective treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Its molecular target is CD 52, a GPI-anchored protein. Herein, we describe the case of a 40-year-old man with MS treated with alemtuzumab, who developed cerebral sinus thrombosis. In the literature, alemtuzumab was associated with venous thrombosis, attributed to a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)-like mechanism. In our case, no PNH clones were detected. Other common causes of cerebral venous thrombosis, like infections and thrombophilia, were excluded, thus the pathogenic mechanism remains obscure. SN - 2211-0356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32540745/Cryptogenic_cerebral_venous_thrombosis_in_a_multiple-sclerosis-patient_treated_with_Alemtuzumab L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2211-0348(20)30322-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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