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The emerging field of venom-microbiomics for exploring venom as a microenvironment, and the corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP).
Toxicon X. 2019 Oct; 4:100016.TX

Abstract

Venom is a known source of novel antimicrobial natural products. The substantial, increasing number of these discoveries have unintentionally culminated in the misconception that venom and venom-producing glands are largely sterile environments. Culture-dependent and -independent studies on the microbial communities in venom microenvironments reveal the presence of archaea, algae, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. Venom-centric microbiome studies are relatively sparse to date with the adaptive advantages that venom-associated microbes might offer to their hosts, or that hosts might provide to venom-associated microbes, remaining largely unknown. We highlight the potential for the discovery of venom microbiomes within the adaptive landscape of venom systems. The considerable number of convergently evolved venomous animals, juxtaposed with the comparatively few known studies to identify microbial communities in venom, provides new possibilities for both biodiversity and therapeutic discoveries. We present an evidence-based argument for integrating microbiology as part of venomics (i.e., venom-microbiomics) and introduce iVAMP, the Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (https://ivamp-consortium.github.io/), as a growing collaborative consortium. We express commitment to the diversity, inclusion and scientific collaboration among researchers interested in this emerging subdiscipline through expansion of the iVAMP consortium.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Quantitative and Systems Biology Graduate Program, University of California Merced, Merced, CA, 95343, USA. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California Merced, Merced, CA, 95343, USA.Center for Microbiology and Cell Biology, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research. Caracas, 1020A, Venezuela.Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, 28223, USA.Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43212, USA.Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California Merced, Merced, CA, 95343, USA.Department of Molecular Medicine and Neurobiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.Venomtech Ltd, Discovery Park, Sandwich, Kent, CT13 9ND, UK.Department of Biological Science, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA.Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle, Tyne and Wear, NE1 8ST, UK.Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center, University of California, San Diego, USA. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, USA.Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 9190401, Israel.Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32550573

Citation

Ul-Hasan, Sabah, et al. "The Emerging Field of Venom-microbiomics for Exploring Venom as a Microenvironment, and the Corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP)." Toxicon: X, vol. 4, 2019, p. 100016.
Ul-Hasan S, Rodríguez-Román E, Reitzel AM, et al. The emerging field of venom-microbiomics for exploring venom as a microenvironment, and the corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP). Toxicon X. 2019;4:100016.
Ul-Hasan, S., Rodríguez-Román, E., Reitzel, A. M., Adams, R. M. M., Herzig, V., Nobile, C. J., Saviola, A. J., Trim, S. A., Stiers, E. E., Moschos, S. A., Keiser, C. N., Petras, D., Moran, Y., & Colston, T. J. (2019). The emerging field of venom-microbiomics for exploring venom as a microenvironment, and the corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP). Toxicon: X, 4, 100016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxcx.2019.100016
Ul-Hasan S, et al. The Emerging Field of Venom-microbiomics for Exploring Venom as a Microenvironment, and the Corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP). Toxicon X. 2019;4:100016. PubMed PMID: 32550573.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The emerging field of venom-microbiomics for exploring venom as a microenvironment, and the corresponding Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (iVAMP). AU - Ul-Hasan,Sabah, AU - Rodríguez-Román,Eduardo, AU - Reitzel,Adam M, AU - Adams,Rachelle M M, AU - Herzig,Volker, AU - Nobile,Clarissa J, AU - Saviola,Anthony J, AU - Trim,Steven A, AU - Stiers,Erin E, AU - Moschos,Sterghios A, AU - Keiser,Carl N, AU - Petras,Daniel, AU - Moran,Yehu, AU - Colston,Timothy J, Y1 - 2019/09/20/ PY - 2020/6/19/entrez PY - 2020/6/19/pubmed PY - 2020/6/19/medline KW - Bacteria KW - Coevolution KW - Holobiont KW - Microbiome KW - Symbiont KW - Virus SP - 100016 EP - 100016 JF - Toxicon: X JO - Toxicon X VL - 4 N2 - Venom is a known source of novel antimicrobial natural products. The substantial, increasing number of these discoveries have unintentionally culminated in the misconception that venom and venom-producing glands are largely sterile environments. Culture-dependent and -independent studies on the microbial communities in venom microenvironments reveal the presence of archaea, algae, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. Venom-centric microbiome studies are relatively sparse to date with the adaptive advantages that venom-associated microbes might offer to their hosts, or that hosts might provide to venom-associated microbes, remaining largely unknown. We highlight the potential for the discovery of venom microbiomes within the adaptive landscape of venom systems. The considerable number of convergently evolved venomous animals, juxtaposed with the comparatively few known studies to identify microbial communities in venom, provides new possibilities for both biodiversity and therapeutic discoveries. We present an evidence-based argument for integrating microbiology as part of venomics (i.e., venom-microbiomics) and introduce iVAMP, the Initiative for Venom Associated Microbes and Parasites (https://ivamp-consortium.github.io/), as a growing collaborative consortium. We express commitment to the diversity, inclusion and scientific collaboration among researchers interested in this emerging subdiscipline through expansion of the iVAMP consortium. SN - 2590-1710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32550573/The_emerging_field_of_venom-microbiomics_for_exploring_venom_as_a_microenvironment,_and_the_corresponding_Initiative_for_Venom_Associated_Microbes_and_Parasites_(iVAMP) L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2590-1710(19)30013-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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