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Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: A Prospective Ultrasound Study.
Am J Epidemiol. 2020 Jun 17 [Online ahead of print]AJ

Abstract

Uterine leiomyomata (UL) are associated with severe reproductive morbidity and are the primary indication for hysterectomy in the United States. A recent prospective cohort study of Black women reported positive associations between intakes of marine-sourced omega-3 fatty acids and UL risk. We examined whether intakes of dietary fat were associated with UL incidence in a 5-year prospective study of premenopausal Black women living in Detroit who underwent serial ultrasound. At baseline (2010-2012) and 20, 40, and 60 months of follow-up, participants underwent transvaginal ultrasound. Among 1,171 UL-free women at baseline, incident UL were detected in 277 women. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of dietary fat and UL incidence. Intakes of total fat and saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated (PUFA), and trans-fat were not appreciably associated with UL incidence. Intake of the marine omega-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid, was associated with 49% higher UL incidence (quartile 4 vs. 1: HR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.14; P trend=0.01). Intakes of total marine omega-3 PUFAs were similarly associated with elevated UL incidence (HR 1.35, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.93; P trend=0.03). It remains unclear whether the fatty acids or persistent environmental pollutants drive the association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Medical Oncology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH.Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI.Epidemiology Branch, Women's Health Group, National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle, NC.Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32556077

Citation

Brasky, Theodore M., et al. "Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: a Prospective Ultrasound Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, 2020.
Brasky TM, Bethea TN, Wesselink AK, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: A Prospective Ultrasound Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2020.
Brasky, T. M., Bethea, T. N., Wesselink, A. K., Wegienka, G. R., Baird, D. D., & Wise, L. A. (2020). Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: A Prospective Ultrasound Study. American Journal of Epidemiology. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwaa097
Brasky TM, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: a Prospective Ultrasound Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2020 Jun 17; PubMed PMID: 32556077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Fat Intake and Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata: A Prospective Ultrasound Study. AU - Brasky,Theodore M, AU - Bethea,Traci N, AU - Wesselink,Amelia K, AU - Wegienka,Ganesa R, AU - Baird,Donna D, AU - Wise,Lauren A, Y1 - 2020/06/17/ PY - 2020/01/02/received PY - 2020/06/04/revised PY - 2020/06/04/accepted PY - 2020/6/20/entrez KW - Uterine leiomyoma KW - cohort KW - diet KW - fat KW - omega-3 fatty acids JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. N2 - Uterine leiomyomata (UL) are associated with severe reproductive morbidity and are the primary indication for hysterectomy in the United States. A recent prospective cohort study of Black women reported positive associations between intakes of marine-sourced omega-3 fatty acids and UL risk. We examined whether intakes of dietary fat were associated with UL incidence in a 5-year prospective study of premenopausal Black women living in Detroit who underwent serial ultrasound. At baseline (2010-2012) and 20, 40, and 60 months of follow-up, participants underwent transvaginal ultrasound. Among 1,171 UL-free women at baseline, incident UL were detected in 277 women. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of dietary fat and UL incidence. Intakes of total fat and saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated (PUFA), and trans-fat were not appreciably associated with UL incidence. Intake of the marine omega-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid, was associated with 49% higher UL incidence (quartile 4 vs. 1: HR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.14; P trend=0.01). Intakes of total marine omega-3 PUFAs were similarly associated with elevated UL incidence (HR 1.35, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.93; P trend=0.03). It remains unclear whether the fatty acids or persistent environmental pollutants drive the association. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32556077/Dietary_Fat_Intake_and_Risk_of_Uterine_Leiomyomata:_A_Prospective_Ultrasound_Study L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwaa097 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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