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Control of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China.
Adv Parasitol. 2020; 110:289-317.AP

Abstract

National surveys suggest that the prevalence of taeniasis has considerably decreased in China, while reported cases indicated T. solium cysticercosis was historically highly endemic in northeastern, central and southwestern China. The high prevalence of taeniasis and cysticercosis there was driven by socio-ecological determinants. Cysticercosis may occur in the central nervous system, spinal cord, subcutaneous muscle, eyes, heart and oral cavity. Neurocysticercosis, the clinically most important type, causes epilepsy, increased intracranial pressure and neuropsychiatric symptoms. New molecular diagnostic techniques have been introduced for high sensitivity and discrimination of Taenia species. Immunological methods remain useful in the diagnosis of cysticercosis, especially neurocysticercosis. The introduction of imaging techniques including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has significantly improved the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. Recently, a combination of pumpkin seeds and areca nut has been explored against taeniasis, while praziquantel and albendazole are administrated simultaneously against cysticercosis, with promising efficacy and low side-effects. The widespread adoption of deworming protocols and techniques for inspection, management and treatment of pigs as well as improved sewage management has contributed to the significant decrease of taeniasis and cysticercosis in northern China. The positive results of these techniques should now be extended to highly endemic areas in western China to achieve the national elimination target for taeniasis and cysticercosis. Elimination of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China will not only benefit public health within China but also set an important example for less developed countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States.Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.Uniting to Combat NTDs Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: zhouxn1@chinacdc.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32563329

Citation

Qian, Men-Bao, et al. "Control of Taeniasis and Cysticercosis in China." Advances in Parasitology, vol. 110, 2020, pp. 289-317.
Qian MB, Xiao N, Li SZ, et al. Control of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China. Adv Parasitol. 2020;110:289-317.
Qian, M. B., Xiao, N., Li, S. Z., Abela-Ridder, B., Carabin, H., Fahrion, A. S., Engels, D., & Zhou, X. N. (2020). Control of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China. Advances in Parasitology, 110, 289-317. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2020.04.005
Qian MB, et al. Control of Taeniasis and Cysticercosis in China. Adv Parasitol. 2020;110:289-317. PubMed PMID: 32563329.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Control of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China. AU - Qian,Men-Bao, AU - Xiao,Ning, AU - Li,Shi-Zhu, AU - Abela-Ridder,Bernadette, AU - Carabin,Hélène, AU - Fahrion,Anna Sophie, AU - Engels,Dirk, AU - Zhou,Xiao-Nong, Y1 - 2020/05/18/ PY - 2020/6/22/entrez PY - 2020/6/22/pubmed PY - 2020/6/22/medline KW - China KW - Control KW - Cysticercosis KW - Diagnosis KW - Epidemiology KW - Taeniasis KW - Treatment SP - 289 EP - 317 JF - Advances in parasitology JO - Adv. Parasitol. VL - 110 N2 - National surveys suggest that the prevalence of taeniasis has considerably decreased in China, while reported cases indicated T. solium cysticercosis was historically highly endemic in northeastern, central and southwestern China. The high prevalence of taeniasis and cysticercosis there was driven by socio-ecological determinants. Cysticercosis may occur in the central nervous system, spinal cord, subcutaneous muscle, eyes, heart and oral cavity. Neurocysticercosis, the clinically most important type, causes epilepsy, increased intracranial pressure and neuropsychiatric symptoms. New molecular diagnostic techniques have been introduced for high sensitivity and discrimination of Taenia species. Immunological methods remain useful in the diagnosis of cysticercosis, especially neurocysticercosis. The introduction of imaging techniques including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has significantly improved the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. Recently, a combination of pumpkin seeds and areca nut has been explored against taeniasis, while praziquantel and albendazole are administrated simultaneously against cysticercosis, with promising efficacy and low side-effects. The widespread adoption of deworming protocols and techniques for inspection, management and treatment of pigs as well as improved sewage management has contributed to the significant decrease of taeniasis and cysticercosis in northern China. The positive results of these techniques should now be extended to highly endemic areas in western China to achieve the national elimination target for taeniasis and cysticercosis. Elimination of taeniasis and cysticercosis in China will not only benefit public health within China but also set an important example for less developed countries. SN - 2163-6079 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32563329/Control_of_taeniasis_and_cysticercosis_in_China L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0065-308X(20)30072-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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