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New directions in the treatment of opioid withdrawal.
Lancet. 2020 Jun 20; 395(10241):1938-1948.Lct

Abstract

The treatment of opioid withdrawal is an important area of clinical concern when treating patients with chronic, non-cancer pain, patients with active opioid use disorder, and patients receiving medication for opioid use disorder. Current standards of care for medically supervised withdrawal include treatment with μ-opioid receptor agonists, (eg, methadone), partial agonists (eg, buprenorphine), and α2-adrenergic receptor agonists (eg, clonidine and lofexidine). Newer agents likewise exploit these pharmacological mechanisms, including tramadol (μ-opioid receptor agonism) and tizanidine (α2 agonism). Areas for future research include managing withdrawal in the context of stabilising patients with opioid use disorder to extended-release naltrexone, transitioning patients with opioid use disorder from methadone to buprenorphine, and tapering opioids in patients with chronic, non-cancer pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division on Substance Use Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: benjamin.srivastava@nyspi.columbia.edu.Division on Substance Use Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.Division on Substance Use Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32563380

Citation

Srivastava, A Benjamin, et al. "New Directions in the Treatment of Opioid Withdrawal." Lancet (London, England), vol. 395, no. 10241, 2020, pp. 1938-1948.
Srivastava AB, Mariani JJ, Levin FR. New directions in the treatment of opioid withdrawal. Lancet. 2020;395(10241):1938-1948.
Srivastava, A. B., Mariani, J. J., & Levin, F. R. (2020). New directions in the treatment of opioid withdrawal. Lancet (London, England), 395(10241), 1938-1948. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30852-7
Srivastava AB, Mariani JJ, Levin FR. New Directions in the Treatment of Opioid Withdrawal. Lancet. 2020 Jun 20;395(10241):1938-1948. PubMed PMID: 32563380.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - New directions in the treatment of opioid withdrawal. AU - Srivastava,A Benjamin, AU - Mariani,John J, AU - Levin,Frances R, PY - 2019/07/10/received PY - 2020/03/10/revised PY - 2020/04/06/accepted PY - 2020/6/22/entrez PY - 2020/6/22/pubmed PY - 2020/6/22/medline SP - 1938 EP - 1948 JF - Lancet (London, England) JO - Lancet VL - 395 IS - 10241 N2 - The treatment of opioid withdrawal is an important area of clinical concern when treating patients with chronic, non-cancer pain, patients with active opioid use disorder, and patients receiving medication for opioid use disorder. Current standards of care for medically supervised withdrawal include treatment with μ-opioid receptor agonists, (eg, methadone), partial agonists (eg, buprenorphine), and α2-adrenergic receptor agonists (eg, clonidine and lofexidine). Newer agents likewise exploit these pharmacological mechanisms, including tramadol (μ-opioid receptor agonism) and tizanidine (α2 agonism). Areas for future research include managing withdrawal in the context of stabilising patients with opioid use disorder to extended-release naltrexone, transitioning patients with opioid use disorder from methadone to buprenorphine, and tapering opioids in patients with chronic, non-cancer pain. SN - 1474-547X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32563380/New_directions_in_the_treatment_of_opioid_withdrawal L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0140-6736(20)30852-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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