Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Contemporary and Future Concepts on Hypertension in African Americans: COVID-19 and Beyond.
J Natl Med Assoc. 2020 Jun; 112(3):315-323.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cardiovascular disease related mortality is the leading cause of death in the United States, with hypertension being the most prevalent and potent risk factor. For decades hypertension has disproportionately affected African Americans, who also have a higher burden of associated comorbidities including diabetes and heart failure.

METHODS

Current literature including guideline reports and newer studies on hypertension in African Americans in PubMed were reviewed. We also reviewed newer publications on the relationship between COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease.

FINDINGS

While APOL1 has been theorized in the epidemiology of hypertension, the increased prevalence and associated risks are primarily due to environmental and lifestyle factors. These factors include poor diet, adverse lifestyle, and social determinants. Hypertension control can be achieved by lifestyle modifications such as low sodium diet, weight loss, and adequate physical activity. When lifestyle modifications alone do not adequately control hypertension, a common occurrence among African Americans who suffer with greater prevalence of resistant hypertension, pharmacological intervention is indicated. The efficacy of renal denervation, and the use of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 and aminopeptidase A inhibitors, have been studied for treatment of resistant hypertension. Furthermore, the recent COVID-19 crisis has been particularly devastating among African Americans who demonstrate increased incidence and poorer health outcomes related to the disease.

CONCLUSION

The disparities in outcomes, which are largely attributable to a greater prevalence of comorbidities such as hypertension and obesity, in addition to adverse environmental and socioeconomic factors, highlight the necessity of specialized clinical approaches and programs for African Americans to address longstanding barriers to equitable care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gerald S. Berenson Endowed Chair in Preventive Cardiology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA. Electronic address: kferdina@tulane.edu.Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32563685

Citation

Ferdinand, Keith, et al. "Contemporary and Future Concepts On Hypertension in African Americans: COVID-19 and Beyond." Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 112, no. 3, 2020, pp. 315-323.
Ferdinand K, Batieste T, Fleurestil M. Contemporary and Future Concepts on Hypertension in African Americans: COVID-19 and Beyond. J Natl Med Assoc. 2020;112(3):315-323.
Ferdinand, K., Batieste, T., & Fleurestil, M. (2020). Contemporary and Future Concepts on Hypertension in African Americans: COVID-19 and Beyond. Journal of the National Medical Association, 112(3), 315-323. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnma.2020.05.018
Ferdinand K, Batieste T, Fleurestil M. Contemporary and Future Concepts On Hypertension in African Americans: COVID-19 and Beyond. J Natl Med Assoc. 2020;112(3):315-323. PubMed PMID: 32563685.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contemporary and Future Concepts on Hypertension in African Americans: COVID-19 and Beyond. AU - Ferdinand,Keith, AU - Batieste,Tivona, AU - Fleurestil,Mashli, Y1 - 2020/06/18/ PY - 2020/05/15/received PY - 2020/05/25/accepted PY - 2020/6/22/pubmed PY - 2020/8/5/medline PY - 2020/6/22/entrez KW - African Americans KW - COVID-19 KW - Hypertension SP - 315 EP - 323 JF - Journal of the National Medical Association JO - J Natl Med Assoc VL - 112 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease related mortality is the leading cause of death in the United States, with hypertension being the most prevalent and potent risk factor. For decades hypertension has disproportionately affected African Americans, who also have a higher burden of associated comorbidities including diabetes and heart failure. METHODS: Current literature including guideline reports and newer studies on hypertension in African Americans in PubMed were reviewed. We also reviewed newer publications on the relationship between COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease. FINDINGS: While APOL1 has been theorized in the epidemiology of hypertension, the increased prevalence and associated risks are primarily due to environmental and lifestyle factors. These factors include poor diet, adverse lifestyle, and social determinants. Hypertension control can be achieved by lifestyle modifications such as low sodium diet, weight loss, and adequate physical activity. When lifestyle modifications alone do not adequately control hypertension, a common occurrence among African Americans who suffer with greater prevalence of resistant hypertension, pharmacological intervention is indicated. The efficacy of renal denervation, and the use of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 and aminopeptidase A inhibitors, have been studied for treatment of resistant hypertension. Furthermore, the recent COVID-19 crisis has been particularly devastating among African Americans who demonstrate increased incidence and poorer health outcomes related to the disease. CONCLUSION: The disparities in outcomes, which are largely attributable to a greater prevalence of comorbidities such as hypertension and obesity, in addition to adverse environmental and socioeconomic factors, highlight the necessity of specialized clinical approaches and programs for African Americans to address longstanding barriers to equitable care. SN - 1943-4693 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32563685/Contemporary_and_Future_Concepts_on_Hypertension_in_African_Americans:_COVID-19_and_Beyond L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0027-9684(20)30117-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -