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Negative-Pressure Ureteroscopic Holmium-YAG Laser Lithotripsy for Ureteral Stones.
Urol Int. 2020 Jun 22 [Online ahead of print]UI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to describe a novel negative-pressure laser lithotripsy device to overcome the deficiencies of the conventional procedure.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Between August 2018 and March 2019, 78 patients with a single ureteral stone underwent retrograde ureteroscopy with a Wolf 8F/9.8F rigid ureteroscope and a 200-μm holmium-YAG laser. The mean stone size was 11.8 mm, measured for the maximum length. The negative-pressure laser lithotripsy device consists of an F5 ureter catheter and a T joint. The closed tip of an F5 ureter catheter is cut off, and it is then inserted within one opening of the T joint. The 200-μm laser fiber is introduced into the ureteral catheter through the other opening of the T joint. The third opening of the T joint is connected to the negative-pressure pipe. The valve end of the Foley catheter is used for sealing the cap. Continuous suction and active irrigation throughout the lithotripsy could maintain adequate visibility.

RESULTS

All ureteroscopic procedures were successful. The negative-pressure device showed good stone retention capabilities, with no observed stone migration. We did not observe any major complications. The stone-free rate was 97.44% (76/78), demonstrated on plain radiography of the kidney-ureter-bladder on the first postoperative day. The stone-free rate after 1 month was 100%.

CONCLUSIONS

The negative-pressure ureteroscopic lithotripsy is easy and safe management for the ureteral stones. It might reduce the risk of stone fragment retropulsion, improve surgical vision, shorten the operative time, and decrease the renal pelvic pressure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China, daydreamwu@sina.com.Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32570250

Citation

Wu, Zhong-Hua, et al. "Negative-Pressure Ureteroscopic Holmium-YAG Laser Lithotripsy for Ureteral Stones." Urologia Internationalis, 2020, pp. 1-6.
Wu ZH, Liu TZ, Wang XH, et al. Negative-Pressure Ureteroscopic Holmium-YAG Laser Lithotripsy for Ureteral Stones. Urol Int. 2020.
Wu, Z. H., Liu, T. Z., Wang, X. H., Wang, Y. Z., Zheng, H., Zhang, Y. G., & Zhang, X. H. (2020). Negative-Pressure Ureteroscopic Holmium-YAG Laser Lithotripsy for Ureteral Stones. Urologia Internationalis, 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1159/000507266
Wu ZH, et al. Negative-Pressure Ureteroscopic Holmium-YAG Laser Lithotripsy for Ureteral Stones. Urol Int. 2020 Jun 22;1-6. PubMed PMID: 32570250.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Negative-Pressure Ureteroscopic Holmium-YAG Laser Lithotripsy for Ureteral Stones. AU - Wu,Zhong-Hua, AU - Liu,Tong-Zu, AU - Wang,Xing-Huan, AU - Wang,Yong-Zhi, AU - Zheng,Hang, AU - Zhang,Yin-Gao, AU - Zhang,Xin-Hua, Y1 - 2020/06/22/ PY - 2020/01/16/received PY - 2020/03/13/accepted PY - 2020/6/23/entrez PY - 2020/6/23/pubmed PY - 2020/6/23/medline KW - Holmium-YAG laser KW - Lithotripsy KW - Negative pressure KW - Ureteral stone KW - Ureteroscopy SP - 1 EP - 6 JF - Urologia internationalis JO - Urol. Int. N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe a novel negative-pressure laser lithotripsy device to overcome the deficiencies of the conventional procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between August 2018 and March 2019, 78 patients with a single ureteral stone underwent retrograde ureteroscopy with a Wolf 8F/9.8F rigid ureteroscope and a 200-μm holmium-YAG laser. The mean stone size was 11.8 mm, measured for the maximum length. The negative-pressure laser lithotripsy device consists of an F5 ureter catheter and a T joint. The closed tip of an F5 ureter catheter is cut off, and it is then inserted within one opening of the T joint. The 200-μm laser fiber is introduced into the ureteral catheter through the other opening of the T joint. The third opening of the T joint is connected to the negative-pressure pipe. The valve end of the Foley catheter is used for sealing the cap. Continuous suction and active irrigation throughout the lithotripsy could maintain adequate visibility. RESULTS: All ureteroscopic procedures were successful. The negative-pressure device showed good stone retention capabilities, with no observed stone migration. We did not observe any major complications. The stone-free rate was 97.44% (76/78), demonstrated on plain radiography of the kidney-ureter-bladder on the first postoperative day. The stone-free rate after 1 month was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: The negative-pressure ureteroscopic lithotripsy is easy and safe management for the ureteral stones. It might reduce the risk of stone fragment retropulsion, improve surgical vision, shorten the operative time, and decrease the renal pelvic pressure. SN - 1423-0399 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32570250/Negative-Pressure_Ureteroscopic_Holmium-YAG_Laser_Lithotripsy_for_Ureteral_Stones L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000507266 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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