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Far-UVC light (222 nm) efficiently and safely inactivates airborne human coronaviruses.
Sci Rep. 2020 06 24; 10(1):10285.SR

Abstract

A direct approach to limit airborne viral transmissions is to inactivate them within a short time of their production. Germicidal ultraviolet light, typically at 254 nm, is effective in this context but, used directly, can be a health hazard to skin and eyes. By contrast, far-UVC light (207-222 nm) efficiently kills pathogens potentially without harm to exposed human tissues. We previously demonstrated that 222-nm far-UVC light efficiently kills airborne influenza virus and we extend those studies to explore far-UVC efficacy against airborne human coronaviruses alpha HCoV-229E and beta HCoV-OC43. Low doses of 1.7 and 1.2 mJ/cm2 inactivated 99.9% of aerosolized coronavirus 229E and OC43, respectively. As all human coronaviruses have similar genomic sizes, far-UVC light would be expected to show similar inactivation efficiency against other human coronaviruses including SARS-CoV-2. Based on the beta-HCoV-OC43 results, continuous far-UVC exposure in occupied public locations at the current regulatory exposure limit (~3 mJ/cm2/hour) would result in ~90% viral inactivation in ~8 minutes, 95% in ~11 minutes, 99% in ~16 minutes and 99.9% inactivation in ~25 minutes. Thus while staying within current regulatory dose limits, low-dose-rate far-UVC exposure can potentially safely provide a major reduction in the ambient level of airborne coronaviruses in occupied public locations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, 10032, USA.Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, 10032, USA.Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, 10032, USA.Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, 10032, USA. djb3@cumc.columbia.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32581288

Citation

Buonanno, Manuela, et al. "Far-UVC Light (222 Nm) Efficiently and Safely Inactivates Airborne Human Coronaviruses." Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, 2020, p. 10285.
Buonanno M, Welch D, Shuryak I, et al. Far-UVC light (222 nm) efficiently and safely inactivates airborne human coronaviruses. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):10285.
Buonanno, M., Welch, D., Shuryak, I., & Brenner, D. J. (2020). Far-UVC light (222 nm) efficiently and safely inactivates airborne human coronaviruses. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 10285. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-67211-2
Buonanno M, et al. Far-UVC Light (222 Nm) Efficiently and Safely Inactivates Airborne Human Coronaviruses. Sci Rep. 2020 06 24;10(1):10285. PubMed PMID: 32581288.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Far-UVC light (222 nm) efficiently and safely inactivates airborne human coronaviruses. AU - Buonanno,Manuela, AU - Welch,David, AU - Shuryak,Igor, AU - Brenner,David J, Y1 - 2020/06/24/ PY - 2020/04/19/received PY - 2020/06/04/accepted PY - 2020/6/26/entrez PY - 2020/6/26/pubmed PY - 2020/7/7/medline SP - 10285 EP - 10285 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - A direct approach to limit airborne viral transmissions is to inactivate them within a short time of their production. Germicidal ultraviolet light, typically at 254 nm, is effective in this context but, used directly, can be a health hazard to skin and eyes. By contrast, far-UVC light (207-222 nm) efficiently kills pathogens potentially without harm to exposed human tissues. We previously demonstrated that 222-nm far-UVC light efficiently kills airborne influenza virus and we extend those studies to explore far-UVC efficacy against airborne human coronaviruses alpha HCoV-229E and beta HCoV-OC43. Low doses of 1.7 and 1.2 mJ/cm2 inactivated 99.9% of aerosolized coronavirus 229E and OC43, respectively. As all human coronaviruses have similar genomic sizes, far-UVC light would be expected to show similar inactivation efficiency against other human coronaviruses including SARS-CoV-2. Based on the beta-HCoV-OC43 results, continuous far-UVC exposure in occupied public locations at the current regulatory exposure limit (~3 mJ/cm2/hour) would result in ~90% viral inactivation in ~8 minutes, 95% in ~11 minutes, 99% in ~16 minutes and 99.9% inactivation in ~25 minutes. Thus while staying within current regulatory dose limits, low-dose-rate far-UVC exposure can potentially safely provide a major reduction in the ambient level of airborne coronaviruses in occupied public locations. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32581288/Far_UVC_light__222_nm__efficiently_and_safely_inactivates_airborne_human_coronaviruses_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-67211-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -