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Association between Trichomonas vaginalis infection and cervical lesions: a population-based, nested case-control study in Taiwan.
Parasitol Res. 2020 Aug; 119(8):2649-2657.PR

Abstract

Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common nonviral sexually transmitted infection. According to the 2019 WHO cancer report, cervical cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer in women. However, previous research, which has not included a large-scale study to date, has revealed that Trichomonas vaginalis increases cervical cancer risk. In this study, we investigated a group of Asian females in Taiwan to determine the association between trichomoniasis and the risk of developing cervical lesions, including cancer, neoplasm, and dysplasia. We conducted a nested case-control study by using the National Health Insurance (NHI) program database in Taiwan. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision classifications (ICD-9-CM) was used to categorize all of the medical conditions for each patient in the case and control groups. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between trichomoniasis and cervical lesions were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression to adjust for all comorbidities and variables. In total, 54,003 individuals were enrolled in the case group and 216,012 were enrolled in the control group. Trichomonas vaginalis exposure had a significant association with cervical lesions (AOR 2.656, 95% CI = 1.411-5.353, p = 0.003), especially cervical cancer (AOR 3.684, 95% CI = 1.622-6.094, p = 0.001). In patients with both trichomoniasis and depression, the relative risk increased 7.480-fold compared to those without trichomoniasis or depression. In conclusion, female patients with Trichomonas vaginalis exposure had a significantly higher risk of developing cervical lesions (especially cervical cancer) than those without exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical Pathology, Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Clinical Pathology, Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.PET Center and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. chienwu@mail.ndmctsgh.edu.tw. Department of Medical Research, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. chienwu@mail.ndmctsgh.edu.tw. Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. chienwu@mail.ndmctsgh.edu.tw.Division of Clinical Pathology, Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. hsinchunglin@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32583161

Citation

Su, Ruei-Yu, et al. "Association Between Trichomonas Vaginalis Infection and Cervical Lesions: a Population-based, Nested Case-control Study in Taiwan." Parasitology Research, vol. 119, no. 8, 2020, pp. 2649-2657.
Su RY, Ho LJ, Yang HY, et al. Association between Trichomonas vaginalis infection and cervical lesions: a population-based, nested case-control study in Taiwan. Parasitol Res. 2020;119(8):2649-2657.
Su, R. Y., Ho, L. J., Yang, H. Y., Chung, C. H., Yang, S. S., Cheng, C. Y., Chien, W. C., & Lin, H. C. (2020). Association between Trichomonas vaginalis infection and cervical lesions: a population-based, nested case-control study in Taiwan. Parasitology Research, 119(8), 2649-2657. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00436-020-06759-4
Su RY, et al. Association Between Trichomonas Vaginalis Infection and Cervical Lesions: a Population-based, Nested Case-control Study in Taiwan. Parasitol Res. 2020;119(8):2649-2657. PubMed PMID: 32583161.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Trichomonas vaginalis infection and cervical lesions: a population-based, nested case-control study in Taiwan. AU - Su,Ruei-Yu, AU - Ho,Li-Ju, AU - Yang,Hung-Yi, AU - Chung,Chi-Hsiang, AU - Yang,Sung-Sen, AU - Cheng,Cheng-Yi, AU - Chien,Wu-Chien, AU - Lin,Hsin-Chung, Y1 - 2020/06/24/ PY - 2020/03/12/received PY - 2020/06/04/accepted PY - 2020/6/26/pubmed PY - 2020/6/26/medline PY - 2020/6/26/entrez KW - Cervical cancer KW - Dysplasia KW - Trichomonas vaginalis SP - 2649 EP - 2657 JF - Parasitology research JO - Parasitol. Res. VL - 119 IS - 8 N2 - Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common nonviral sexually transmitted infection. According to the 2019 WHO cancer report, cervical cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer in women. However, previous research, which has not included a large-scale study to date, has revealed that Trichomonas vaginalis increases cervical cancer risk. In this study, we investigated a group of Asian females in Taiwan to determine the association between trichomoniasis and the risk of developing cervical lesions, including cancer, neoplasm, and dysplasia. We conducted a nested case-control study by using the National Health Insurance (NHI) program database in Taiwan. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision classifications (ICD-9-CM) was used to categorize all of the medical conditions for each patient in the case and control groups. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between trichomoniasis and cervical lesions were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression to adjust for all comorbidities and variables. In total, 54,003 individuals were enrolled in the case group and 216,012 were enrolled in the control group. Trichomonas vaginalis exposure had a significant association with cervical lesions (AOR 2.656, 95% CI = 1.411-5.353, p = 0.003), especially cervical cancer (AOR 3.684, 95% CI = 1.622-6.094, p = 0.001). In patients with both trichomoniasis and depression, the relative risk increased 7.480-fold compared to those without trichomoniasis or depression. In conclusion, female patients with Trichomonas vaginalis exposure had a significantly higher risk of developing cervical lesions (especially cervical cancer) than those without exposure. SN - 1432-1955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32583161/Association_between_Trichomonas_vaginalis_infection_and_cervical_lesions:_a_population-based,_nested_case-control_study_in_Taiwan L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-020-06759-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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