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Application of microfluidic technology in food processing.
Food Funct. 2020 Jul 22; 11(7):5726-5737.FF

Abstract

Microfluidic technology is interdisciplinary with a diversity of applications including in food processing. The rapidly growing global population demands more advanced technologies in food processing to produce more functional and safer food, and for such processing microfluidic devices are a popular choice. This review critically critiques the state-of-the-art designs of microfluidic devices and their applications in food processing, and identifies the key research trends and future research directions for maximizing the value of microfluidic technology. Capillary, planar, and terrace droplet generation systems are currently used in the design of microfluidic devices, each with their strengths and weaknesses as applied in food processing, for emulsification, food safety measurements, and bioactive compound extraction. Conventional channel-based microfluidic devices are prone to clogging, and have high labor costs and low productivity, and their "directional pressure" restricts scaling-up capabilities. These disadvantages can be overcome by using "inside-out centrifugal force" and the new generation continuous flow thin-film microfluidic Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) which facilitates translating laboratory processing into commercial products. Also highlighted is controlling protein-polysaccharide interactions and the applications of the produced ingredients in food formulations as targets for future development in the field.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, China. he0091@gmail.com and Flinders Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, Australia. colin.raston@flinders.edu.au.Flinders Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, Australia. colin.raston@flinders.edu.au.School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798, Singapore.Flinders Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, Australia. colin.raston@flinders.edu.au.Flinders Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, Australia. colin.raston@flinders.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32584365

Citation

He, Shan, et al. "Application of Microfluidic Technology in Food Processing." Food & Function, vol. 11, no. 7, 2020, pp. 5726-5737.
He S, Joseph N, Feng S, et al. Application of microfluidic technology in food processing. Food Funct. 2020;11(7):5726-5737.
He, S., Joseph, N., Feng, S., Jellicoe, M., & Raston, C. L. (2020). Application of microfluidic technology in food processing. Food & Function, 11(7), 5726-5737. https://doi.org/10.1039/d0fo01278e
He S, et al. Application of Microfluidic Technology in Food Processing. Food Funct. 2020 Jul 22;11(7):5726-5737. PubMed PMID: 32584365.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of microfluidic technology in food processing. AU - He,Shan, AU - Joseph,Nikita, AU - Feng,Shilun, AU - Jellicoe,Matt, AU - Raston,Colin L, PY - 2020/6/26/pubmed PY - 2020/6/26/medline PY - 2020/6/26/entrez SP - 5726 EP - 5737 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 11 IS - 7 N2 - Microfluidic technology is interdisciplinary with a diversity of applications including in food processing. The rapidly growing global population demands more advanced technologies in food processing to produce more functional and safer food, and for such processing microfluidic devices are a popular choice. This review critically critiques the state-of-the-art designs of microfluidic devices and their applications in food processing, and identifies the key research trends and future research directions for maximizing the value of microfluidic technology. Capillary, planar, and terrace droplet generation systems are currently used in the design of microfluidic devices, each with their strengths and weaknesses as applied in food processing, for emulsification, food safety measurements, and bioactive compound extraction. Conventional channel-based microfluidic devices are prone to clogging, and have high labor costs and low productivity, and their "directional pressure" restricts scaling-up capabilities. These disadvantages can be overcome by using "inside-out centrifugal force" and the new generation continuous flow thin-film microfluidic Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) which facilitates translating laboratory processing into commercial products. Also highlighted is controlling protein-polysaccharide interactions and the applications of the produced ingredients in food formulations as targets for future development in the field. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32584365/Application_of_microfluidic_technology_in_food_processing L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/d0fo01278e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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