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Septic Joints: Finger and Wrist.
Hand Clin. 2020 Aug; 36(3):331-338.HC

Abstract

Infections in the joints of the hand and wrist carry the risk of significant morbidity. Common presenting symptoms include joint redness, swelling, and pseudoparalysis that occurs several days following a penetrating trauma. Diagnostic workup should be expedited, including a laboratory evaluation and arthrocentesis. Imaging, including radiographs, ultrasound, computed tomography, and/or MRI, are helpful tools in diagnosis. Once infection is identified, prompt surgical debridement and antibiotics are required. Once the infection has been managed, hand therapy is initiated to decrease the risk of stiffness. Stiffness is the most common complication following infection; additional reported complications include arthritis, ankylosis, and amputation."

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Oklahoma, 800 Stanton L Young Boulevard, Suite 3400, Oklahoma City, OK 73003, USA. Electronic address: cheno848@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32586459

Citation

Chenoweth, Brian. "Septic Joints: Finger and Wrist." Hand Clinics, vol. 36, no. 3, 2020, pp. 331-338.
Chenoweth B. Septic Joints: Finger and Wrist. Hand Clin. 2020;36(3):331-338.
Chenoweth, B. (2020). Septic Joints: Finger and Wrist. Hand Clinics, 36(3), 331-338. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hcl.2020.03.006
Chenoweth B. Septic Joints: Finger and Wrist. Hand Clin. 2020;36(3):331-338. PubMed PMID: 32586459.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Septic Joints: Finger and Wrist. A1 - Chenoweth,Brian, PY - 2020/6/27/entrez KW - Infection KW - Interphalangeal KW - Metacarpophalangeal KW - Septic joint KW - Wrist SP - 331 EP - 338 JF - Hand clinics JO - Hand Clin VL - 36 IS - 3 N2 - Infections in the joints of the hand and wrist carry the risk of significant morbidity. Common presenting symptoms include joint redness, swelling, and pseudoparalysis that occurs several days following a penetrating trauma. Diagnostic workup should be expedited, including a laboratory evaluation and arthrocentesis. Imaging, including radiographs, ultrasound, computed tomography, and/or MRI, are helpful tools in diagnosis. Once infection is identified, prompt surgical debridement and antibiotics are required. Once the infection has been managed, hand therapy is initiated to decrease the risk of stiffness. Stiffness is the most common complication following infection; additional reported complications include arthritis, ankylosis, and amputation." SN - 1558-1969 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32586459/Septic_Joints:_Finger_and_Wrist L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-0712(20)30033-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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