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Inbreeding depression in one of the last DFTD-free wild populations of Tasmanian devils.
PeerJ. 2020; 8:e9220.P

Abstract

Background

Vulnerable species experiencing inbreeding depression are prone to localised extinctions because of their reduced fitness. For Tasmanian devils, the rapid spread of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has led to population declines and fragmentation across the species' range. Here we show that one of the few remaining DFTD-free populations of Tasmanian devils is experiencing inbreeding depression. Moreover, this population has experienced a significant reduction in reproductive success over recent years.

Methods

We used 32 microsatellite loci to examine changes in genetic diversity and inbreeding in the wild population at Woolnorth, alongside field data on breeding success from females to test for inbreeding depression.

Results

Wefound that maternal internal relatedness has a negative impact on litter sizes. The results of this study imply that this population may be entering an extinction vortex and that to protect the population genetic rescue should be considered. This study provides conservation managers with useful information for managing wild devils and provides support for the "Wild Devil Recovery Program", which is currently augmenting small, isolated populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Save the Tasmanian Devil Program, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Toledo Zoo, Toledo, OH, United States of America.Save the Tasmanian Devil Program, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. San Diego Zoo Global, San Diego, CA, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32587794

Citation

Gooley, Rebecca M., et al. "Inbreeding Depression in One of the Last DFTD-free Wild Populations of Tasmanian Devils." PeerJ, vol. 8, 2020, pp. e9220.
Gooley RM, Hogg CJ, Fox S, et al. Inbreeding depression in one of the last DFTD-free wild populations of Tasmanian devils. PeerJ. 2020;8:e9220.
Gooley, R. M., Hogg, C. J., Fox, S., Pemberton, D., Belov, K., & Grueber, C. E. (2020). Inbreeding depression in one of the last DFTD-free wild populations of Tasmanian devils. PeerJ, 8, e9220. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9220
Gooley RM, et al. Inbreeding Depression in One of the Last DFTD-free Wild Populations of Tasmanian Devils. PeerJ. 2020;8:e9220. PubMed PMID: 32587794.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inbreeding depression in one of the last DFTD-free wild populations of Tasmanian devils. AU - Gooley,Rebecca M, AU - Hogg,Carolyn J, AU - Fox,Samantha, AU - Pemberton,David, AU - Belov,Katherine, AU - Grueber,Catherine E, Y1 - 2020/06/16/ PY - 2019/09/11/received PY - 2020/04/28/accepted PY - 2020/6/27/entrez PY - 2020/6/27/pubmed PY - 2020/6/27/medline KW - Internal relatedness KW - Litter size KW - Reproductive success SP - e9220 EP - e9220 JF - PeerJ JO - PeerJ VL - 8 N2 - Background: Vulnerable species experiencing inbreeding depression are prone to localised extinctions because of their reduced fitness. For Tasmanian devils, the rapid spread of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has led to population declines and fragmentation across the species' range. Here we show that one of the few remaining DFTD-free populations of Tasmanian devils is experiencing inbreeding depression. Moreover, this population has experienced a significant reduction in reproductive success over recent years. Methods: We used 32 microsatellite loci to examine changes in genetic diversity and inbreeding in the wild population at Woolnorth, alongside field data on breeding success from females to test for inbreeding depression. Results: Wefound that maternal internal relatedness has a negative impact on litter sizes. The results of this study imply that this population may be entering an extinction vortex and that to protect the population genetic rescue should be considered. This study provides conservation managers with useful information for managing wild devils and provides support for the "Wild Devil Recovery Program", which is currently augmenting small, isolated populations. SN - 2167-8359 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32587794/Inbreeding_depression_in_one_of_the_last_DFTD-free_wild_populations_of_Tasmanian_devils L2 - https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9220 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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