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Pharmaceuticals' removal by constructed wetlands: a critical evaluation and meta-analysis on performance, risk reduction, and role of physicochemical properties on removal mechanisms.
J Water Health. 2020 Jun; 18(3):253-291.JW

Abstract

This paper presents a comprehensive and critical analysis of the removal of pharmaceuticals (PhCs), the governing physicochemical properties, and removal mechanisms in constructed wetlands (CWs). The average removal efficiency of the most widely studied 34 PhCs ranges from 21% to 93%, with the exception of one PhC that exhibited negative removal. Moreover, CWs are effective in significantly reducing the environmental risk caused by many PhCs. Based on risk assessment, 12 PhCs were classified under high risk category (oxytetracycline > ofloxacin > sulfamethoxazole > erythromycin > sulfadiazine > gemfibrozil > ibuprofen > acetaminophen > salicylic acid > sulfamethazine > naproxen > clarithromycin), which could be considered for regular monitoring, water quality standard formulation and control purposes. Biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) is responsible for the removal of the majority of PhCs, often in conjunction with other mechanisms (e.g., adsorption/sorption, plant uptake, and photodegradation). The physicochemical properties of molecules play a pivotal role in the elimination processes, and could serve as important predictors of removal. The correlation and multiple linear regression analysis suggest that organic carbon sorption coefficient (Log Koc), octanol-water distribution coefficient (Log Dow), and molecular weight form a good predictive linear regression model for the removal efficiency of PhCs (R2 = 0.65, P-value <0.05).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université de Paris, Institut de physique du globe de Paris, CNRS, F-75005 Paris, France E-mail: hi.wtmconsult@gmail.com; Water Treatment and Management Consultancy, B.V., 2289 ED Rijswijk, The Netherlands.IHE Delft, Institute for Water Education, 2611 AX Delft, The Netherlands; Water Treatment and Management Consultancy, B.V., 2289 ED Rijswijk, The Netherlands.Université de Paris, Institut de physique du globe de Paris, CNRS, F-75005 Paris, France E-mail: hi.wtmconsult@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32589615

Citation

Ilyas, Huma, et al. "Pharmaceuticals' Removal By Constructed Wetlands: a Critical Evaluation and Meta-analysis On Performance, Risk Reduction, and Role of Physicochemical Properties On Removal Mechanisms." Journal of Water and Health, vol. 18, no. 3, 2020, pp. 253-291.
Ilyas H, Masih I, van Hullebusch ED. Pharmaceuticals' removal by constructed wetlands: a critical evaluation and meta-analysis on performance, risk reduction, and role of physicochemical properties on removal mechanisms. J Water Health. 2020;18(3):253-291.
Ilyas, H., Masih, I., & van Hullebusch, E. D. (2020). Pharmaceuticals' removal by constructed wetlands: a critical evaluation and meta-analysis on performance, risk reduction, and role of physicochemical properties on removal mechanisms. Journal of Water and Health, 18(3), 253-291. https://doi.org/10.2166/wh.2020.213
Ilyas H, Masih I, van Hullebusch ED. Pharmaceuticals' Removal By Constructed Wetlands: a Critical Evaluation and Meta-analysis On Performance, Risk Reduction, and Role of Physicochemical Properties On Removal Mechanisms. J Water Health. 2020;18(3):253-291. PubMed PMID: 32589615.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pharmaceuticals' removal by constructed wetlands: a critical evaluation and meta-analysis on performance, risk reduction, and role of physicochemical properties on removal mechanisms. AU - Ilyas,Huma, AU - Masih,Ilyas, AU - van Hullebusch,Eric D, PY - 2020/6/27/entrez PY - 2020/6/27/pubmed PY - 2020/6/27/medline SP - 253 EP - 291 JF - Journal of water and health JO - J Water Health VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - This paper presents a comprehensive and critical analysis of the removal of pharmaceuticals (PhCs), the governing physicochemical properties, and removal mechanisms in constructed wetlands (CWs). The average removal efficiency of the most widely studied 34 PhCs ranges from 21% to 93%, with the exception of one PhC that exhibited negative removal. Moreover, CWs are effective in significantly reducing the environmental risk caused by many PhCs. Based on risk assessment, 12 PhCs were classified under high risk category (oxytetracycline > ofloxacin > sulfamethoxazole > erythromycin > sulfadiazine > gemfibrozil > ibuprofen > acetaminophen > salicylic acid > sulfamethazine > naproxen > clarithromycin), which could be considered for regular monitoring, water quality standard formulation and control purposes. Biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) is responsible for the removal of the majority of PhCs, often in conjunction with other mechanisms (e.g., adsorption/sorption, plant uptake, and photodegradation). The physicochemical properties of molecules play a pivotal role in the elimination processes, and could serve as important predictors of removal. The correlation and multiple linear regression analysis suggest that organic carbon sorption coefficient (Log Koc), octanol-water distribution coefficient (Log Dow), and molecular weight form a good predictive linear regression model for the removal efficiency of PhCs (R2 = 0.65, P-value <0.05). SN - 1477-8920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32589615/Pharmaceuticals'_removal_by_constructed_wetlands:_a_critical_evaluation_and_meta-analysis_on_performance,_risk_reduction,_and_role_of_physicochemical_properties_on_removal_mechanisms L2 - https://iwaponline.com/jwh/article-lookup/doi/10.2166/wh.2020.213 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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