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Biodegradation of sulfonamides in both oxic and anoxic zones of vertical flow constructed wetland and the potential degraders.
Environ Pollut. 2020 Jun 19; 265(Pt B):115040.EP

Abstract

The pollution of wastewater with antibiotics and antibiotics resistance genes has attracted public concerns about ecosystem and global health. Swine wastewater can contain high concentrations of antibiotics, especially sulfonamides, even after full-scale wastewater treatment. In this study, mesocosm-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands (VF-CWs) were applied to abate nutrients and antibiotics in swine wastewater containing sulfonamides. VF-CWs performed well in the removal of both nutrients and antibiotics. Sulfonamides did not influence total organic carbon (TOC) and total phosphorus (TP) removal, and even slightly enhanced NH4+-N removal. High removal efficiencies (26.42-84.05%) were achieved for sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfamethazine (SMZ). Together with lab-scale sorption and biodegradation experiments, microbial degradation was found to be the most important removal mechanism for sulfonamides in VF-CWs. Sulfonamides addition increased bacterial alpha-diversity and changed microbial community structure. Moreover, antibiotics promoted antibiotic-resistant or -degrading bacteria. Bacillus, Geobacter and other seven genera were correlated with sulfonamides reduction under either aerobic or anaerobic condition. In summary, VF-CW is a suitable alternative for swine wastewater treatment, and biodegradation plays the key role in sulfonamides abatement. Main findings of the work. This was the first work to combine bacterial community analysis with microcosm experiments to uncover the major removal mechanism of sulfonamides in constructed wetlands.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKJLESPC), Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control (BKLEOC), School of Environment, POPs Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China. Electronic address: xiesg@pku.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32593905

Citation

Chen, Jianfei, et al. "Biodegradation of Sulfonamides in Both Oxic and Anoxic Zones of Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland and the Potential Degraders." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 265, no. Pt B, 2020, p. 115040.
Chen J, Tong T, Jiang X, et al. Biodegradation of sulfonamides in both oxic and anoxic zones of vertical flow constructed wetland and the potential degraders. Environ Pollut. 2020;265(Pt B):115040.
Chen, J., Tong, T., Jiang, X., & Xie, S. (2020). Biodegradation of sulfonamides in both oxic and anoxic zones of vertical flow constructed wetland and the potential degraders. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 265(Pt B), 115040. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2020.115040
Chen J, et al. Biodegradation of Sulfonamides in Both Oxic and Anoxic Zones of Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland and the Potential Degraders. Environ Pollut. 2020 Jun 19;265(Pt B):115040. PubMed PMID: 32593905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biodegradation of sulfonamides in both oxic and anoxic zones of vertical flow constructed wetland and the potential degraders. AU - Chen,Jianfei, AU - Tong,Tianli, AU - Jiang,Xinshu, AU - Xie,Shuguang, Y1 - 2020/06/19/ PY - 2020/03/24/received PY - 2020/06/06/revised PY - 2020/06/13/accepted PY - 2020/6/29/entrez KW - Bacterial community KW - Biodegradation KW - Constructed wetland KW - Sulfonamides KW - Swine wastewater SP - 115040 EP - 115040 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ. Pollut. VL - 265 IS - Pt B N2 - The pollution of wastewater with antibiotics and antibiotics resistance genes has attracted public concerns about ecosystem and global health. Swine wastewater can contain high concentrations of antibiotics, especially sulfonamides, even after full-scale wastewater treatment. In this study, mesocosm-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands (VF-CWs) were applied to abate nutrients and antibiotics in swine wastewater containing sulfonamides. VF-CWs performed well in the removal of both nutrients and antibiotics. Sulfonamides did not influence total organic carbon (TOC) and total phosphorus (TP) removal, and even slightly enhanced NH4+-N removal. High removal efficiencies (26.42-84.05%) were achieved for sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfamethazine (SMZ). Together with lab-scale sorption and biodegradation experiments, microbial degradation was found to be the most important removal mechanism for sulfonamides in VF-CWs. Sulfonamides addition increased bacterial alpha-diversity and changed microbial community structure. Moreover, antibiotics promoted antibiotic-resistant or -degrading bacteria. Bacillus, Geobacter and other seven genera were correlated with sulfonamides reduction under either aerobic or anaerobic condition. In summary, VF-CW is a suitable alternative for swine wastewater treatment, and biodegradation plays the key role in sulfonamides abatement. Main findings of the work. This was the first work to combine bacterial community analysis with microcosm experiments to uncover the major removal mechanism of sulfonamides in constructed wetlands. SN - 1873-6424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32593905/Biodegradation_of_sulfonamides_in_both_oxic_and_anoxic_zones_of_vertical_flow_constructed_wetland_and_the_potential_degraders L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(20)32101-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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