Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Meal and snack frequency in relation to diet quality in Japanese adults: a cross-sectional study using different definitions of meals and snacks.
Br J Nutr. 2020 12 14; 124(11):1219-1228.BJ

Abstract

Epidemiological evidence on the association between eating frequency and overall diet quality does not represent a consistent picture. This cross-sectional study examined the associations of meal frequency and snack frequency with diet quality, using different definitions of meals and snacks. Based on 4-d weighed dietary record data obtained from 639 Japanese adults aged 20-81 years, all eating occasions were divided into meals or snacks based on either the participant-identified or time-of-day definitions. Diet quality was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) and Nutrient-Rich Food Index 9.3 (NRF9.3). One additional meal per d increased the HEI-2015 total score by 3·6 and 1·3 points based on the participant-identified and time-of-day definitions, respectively. A higher meal frequency was also associated with higher values of some of the HEI-2015 component scores (total vegetables, greens and beans, and total protein foods), irrespective of how meals were defined. Additionally, one additional participant-identified snack per d increased the HEI-2015 total score by 0·7 points. The frequency of participant-identified snacks also showed positive associations with some of the HEI-2015 component scores (total fruits, whole fruits, total vegetables, greens and beans, dairy products, and Na). However, the frequency of time-of-day defined snacks was not associated with the total scores of HEI-2015, although there were some associations for its components. Similar findings were obtained when the NRF9.3 was used. In conclusion, higher meal frequency was consistently associated with higher diet quality, while associations between snack frequency and diet quality varied depending on the definition of snacks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Tokyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan.Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Tokyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan.Nutrition Innovation Centre for Food and Health (NICHE), School of Biomedical Sciences, Ulster University, ColeraineBT52 1SA, UK.Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Tokyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan. Department of Nutritional Epidemiology and Shokuiku, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Tokyo162-8636, Japan.Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Medicine, Toho University, Tokyo143-8540, Japan.Ikurien-naka, Ibaraki311-0105, Japan.Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Tokyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32594916

Citation

Murakami, Kentaro, et al. "Meal and Snack Frequency in Relation to Diet Quality in Japanese Adults: a Cross-sectional Study Using Different Definitions of Meals and Snacks." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 124, no. 11, 2020, pp. 1219-1228.
Murakami K, Shinozaki N, Livingstone MBE, et al. Meal and snack frequency in relation to diet quality in Japanese adults: a cross-sectional study using different definitions of meals and snacks. Br J Nutr. 2020;124(11):1219-1228.
Murakami, K., Shinozaki, N., Livingstone, M. B. E., Fujiwara, A., Asakura, K., Masayasu, S., & Sasaki, S. (2020). Meal and snack frequency in relation to diet quality in Japanese adults: a cross-sectional study using different definitions of meals and snacks. The British Journal of Nutrition, 124(11), 1219-1228. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114520002317
Murakami K, et al. Meal and Snack Frequency in Relation to Diet Quality in Japanese Adults: a Cross-sectional Study Using Different Definitions of Meals and Snacks. Br J Nutr. 2020 12 14;124(11):1219-1228. PubMed PMID: 32594916.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meal and snack frequency in relation to diet quality in Japanese adults: a cross-sectional study using different definitions of meals and snacks. AU - Murakami,Kentaro, AU - Shinozaki,Nana, AU - Livingstone,M Barbara E, AU - Fujiwara,Aya, AU - Asakura,Keiko, AU - Masayasu,Shizuko, AU - Sasaki,Satoshi, Y1 - 2020/06/29/ PY - 2020/7/1/pubmed PY - 2021/3/20/medline PY - 2020/6/30/entrez KW - Diet quality KW - Eating frequency KW - Japan KW - Meals KW - Snacks SP - 1219 EP - 1228 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 124 IS - 11 N2 - Epidemiological evidence on the association between eating frequency and overall diet quality does not represent a consistent picture. This cross-sectional study examined the associations of meal frequency and snack frequency with diet quality, using different definitions of meals and snacks. Based on 4-d weighed dietary record data obtained from 639 Japanese adults aged 20-81 years, all eating occasions were divided into meals or snacks based on either the participant-identified or time-of-day definitions. Diet quality was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) and Nutrient-Rich Food Index 9.3 (NRF9.3). One additional meal per d increased the HEI-2015 total score by 3·6 and 1·3 points based on the participant-identified and time-of-day definitions, respectively. A higher meal frequency was also associated with higher values of some of the HEI-2015 component scores (total vegetables, greens and beans, and total protein foods), irrespective of how meals were defined. Additionally, one additional participant-identified snack per d increased the HEI-2015 total score by 0·7 points. The frequency of participant-identified snacks also showed positive associations with some of the HEI-2015 component scores (total fruits, whole fruits, total vegetables, greens and beans, dairy products, and Na). However, the frequency of time-of-day defined snacks was not associated with the total scores of HEI-2015, although there were some associations for its components. Similar findings were obtained when the NRF9.3 was used. In conclusion, higher meal frequency was consistently associated with higher diet quality, while associations between snack frequency and diet quality varied depending on the definition of snacks. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32594916/Meal_and_snack_frequency_in_relation_to_diet_quality_in_Japanese_adults:_a_cross_sectional_study_using_different_definitions_of_meals_and_snacks_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114520002317/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -