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The coexistence of threshold and memory switching characteristics of ALD HfO2 memristor synaptic arrays for energy-efficient neuromorphic computing.
Nanoscale. 2020 Jul 09; 12(26):14120-14134.N

Abstract

The development of bioinspired electronic devices that can mimic the biological synapses is an essential step towards the development of efficient neuromorphic systems to simulate the functions of the human brain. Among various materials that can be utilized to attain electronic synapses, the existing semiconductor industry-compatible conventional materials are more favorable due to their low cost, easy fabrication and reliable switching properties. In this work, atomic layer deposited HfO2-based memristor synaptic arrays are fabricated. The coexistence of threshold switching (TS) and memory switching (MS) behaviors is obtained by modulating the device current. The TS characteristics are exploited to emulate essential synaptic functions. The Ag diffusive dynamics of our electronic synapses, analogous to the Ca2+ dynamics in biological synapses, is utilized to emulate synaptic functions. Electronic synapses successfully emulate paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), post-tetanic potentiation (PTP), spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), short-term potentiation (STP), long-term potentiation (LTP) and transition from STP to LTP with rehearsals. The psychological memorization model of short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) transition is mimicked by image memorization in crossbar array devices. Reliable and repeatable bipolar MS behaviors with a low operating voltage are obtained by a higher compliance current for energy-efficient nonvolatile memory applications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea. cchoi@hanyang.ac.kr.Department of Physics, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi 127788, United Arab Emirates.Centre for Advanced Electronics & Photovoltaic Engineering, International Islamic University, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan.Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea. cchoi@hanyang.ac.kr.Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea. cchoi@hanyang.ac.kr.Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea. cchoi@hanyang.ac.kr.Department of Physics, Myongji University, Gyeonggi-do 17058, Republic of Korea.Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea. cchoi@hanyang.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32597451

Citation

Abbas, Haider, et al. "The Coexistence of Threshold and Memory Switching Characteristics of ALD HfO2 Memristor Synaptic Arrays for Energy-efficient Neuromorphic Computing." Nanoscale, vol. 12, no. 26, 2020, pp. 14120-14134.
Abbas H, Abbas Y, Hassan G, et al. The coexistence of threshold and memory switching characteristics of ALD HfO2 memristor synaptic arrays for energy-efficient neuromorphic computing. Nanoscale. 2020;12(26):14120-14134.
Abbas, H., Abbas, Y., Hassan, G., Sokolov, A. S., Jeon, Y. R., Ku, B., Kang, C. J., & Choi, C. (2020). The coexistence of threshold and memory switching characteristics of ALD HfO2 memristor synaptic arrays for energy-efficient neuromorphic computing. Nanoscale, 12(26), 14120-14134. https://doi.org/10.1039/d0nr02335c
Abbas H, et al. The Coexistence of Threshold and Memory Switching Characteristics of ALD HfO2 Memristor Synaptic Arrays for Energy-efficient Neuromorphic Computing. Nanoscale. 2020 Jul 9;12(26):14120-14134. PubMed PMID: 32597451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The coexistence of threshold and memory switching characteristics of ALD HfO2 memristor synaptic arrays for energy-efficient neuromorphic computing. AU - Abbas,Haider, AU - Abbas,Yawar, AU - Hassan,Gul, AU - Sokolov,Andrey Sergeevich, AU - Jeon,Yu-Rim, AU - Ku,Boncheol, AU - Kang,Chi Jung, AU - Choi,Changhwan, PY - 2020/7/1/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline PY - 2020/6/30/entrez SP - 14120 EP - 14134 JF - Nanoscale JO - Nanoscale VL - 12 IS - 26 N2 - The development of bioinspired electronic devices that can mimic the biological synapses is an essential step towards the development of efficient neuromorphic systems to simulate the functions of the human brain. Among various materials that can be utilized to attain electronic synapses, the existing semiconductor industry-compatible conventional materials are more favorable due to their low cost, easy fabrication and reliable switching properties. In this work, atomic layer deposited HfO2-based memristor synaptic arrays are fabricated. The coexistence of threshold switching (TS) and memory switching (MS) behaviors is obtained by modulating the device current. The TS characteristics are exploited to emulate essential synaptic functions. The Ag diffusive dynamics of our electronic synapses, analogous to the Ca2+ dynamics in biological synapses, is utilized to emulate synaptic functions. Electronic synapses successfully emulate paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), post-tetanic potentiation (PTP), spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), short-term potentiation (STP), long-term potentiation (LTP) and transition from STP to LTP with rehearsals. The psychological memorization model of short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) transition is mimicked by image memorization in crossbar array devices. Reliable and repeatable bipolar MS behaviors with a low operating voltage are obtained by a higher compliance current for energy-efficient nonvolatile memory applications. SN - 2040-3372 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32597451/The_coexistence_of_threshold_and_memory_switching_characteristics_of_ALD_HfO2_memristor_synaptic_arrays_for_energy_efficient_neuromorphic_computing_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/d0nr02335c DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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