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Depression and cardiovascular autonomic control: a matter of vagus and sex paradox.
Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2020 Sep; 116:154-161.NB

Abstract

Depression is a well-established stress-related risk factor for several diseases, mainly for those with cardiovascular outcomes. The mechanisms that link depression disorders with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) include dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system. Heart rate variability analysis is a widely-used non-invasive method that can simultaneously quantify the activity of the two branches of cardiac autonomic neural control and provide insights about their pathophysiological alterations. Recent scientific literature suggests that sex influences the relationship between depressive symptoms and cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Moreover, a few studies highlight a possible sex paradox: depressed women, despite a greater vagal tone, experience a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular events than depressed men. Although there are striking sex differences in the incidence of depression, scanty data on this topic are available. Lastly, studies on the heart-brain axis bidirectionality and the role of sex are fundamental not only to clarify the biological bases of depression-CVD comorbidity, but also to develop alternative therapies, where vagus nerve appears to be a promising target of non-invasive neuromodulation techniques.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlínico, Milan, Italy; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlínico, Milan, Italy; Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, Stress Physiology Lab, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlínico, Milan, Italy; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; Laboratory of Autonomic and Cognitive Neuroscience, Methodist University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlínico, Milan, Italy; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlínico, Milan, Italy; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, Stress Physiology Lab, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlínico, Milan, Italy; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: nicola.montano@unimi.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32598983

Citation

Tobaldini, Eleonora, et al. "Depression and Cardiovascular Autonomic Control: a Matter of Vagus and Sex Paradox." Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 116, 2020, pp. 154-161.
Tobaldini E, Carandina A, Toschi-Dias E, et al. Depression and cardiovascular autonomic control: a matter of vagus and sex paradox. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2020;116:154-161.
Tobaldini, E., Carandina, A., Toschi-Dias, E., Erba, L., Furlan, L., Sgoifo, A., & Montano, N. (2020). Depression and cardiovascular autonomic control: a matter of vagus and sex paradox. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 116, 154-161. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2020.06.029
Tobaldini E, et al. Depression and Cardiovascular Autonomic Control: a Matter of Vagus and Sex Paradox. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2020;116:154-161. PubMed PMID: 32598983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depression and cardiovascular autonomic control: a matter of vagus and sex paradox. AU - Tobaldini,Eleonora, AU - Carandina,Angelica, AU - Toschi-Dias,Edgar, AU - Erba,Luca, AU - Furlan,Ludovico, AU - Sgoifo,Andrea, AU - Montano,Nicola, Y1 - 2020/06/26/ PY - 2019/11/26/received PY - 2020/05/13/revised PY - 2020/06/24/accepted PY - 2020/7/1/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline PY - 2020/6/30/entrez KW - Cardiac autonomic control KW - Depression KW - Heart rate variability KW - Neuromodulation KW - Sex differences KW - Vagal stimulation SP - 154 EP - 161 JF - Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews JO - Neurosci Biobehav Rev VL - 116 N2 - Depression is a well-established stress-related risk factor for several diseases, mainly for those with cardiovascular outcomes. The mechanisms that link depression disorders with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) include dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system. Heart rate variability analysis is a widely-used non-invasive method that can simultaneously quantify the activity of the two branches of cardiac autonomic neural control and provide insights about their pathophysiological alterations. Recent scientific literature suggests that sex influences the relationship between depressive symptoms and cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Moreover, a few studies highlight a possible sex paradox: depressed women, despite a greater vagal tone, experience a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular events than depressed men. Although there are striking sex differences in the incidence of depression, scanty data on this topic are available. Lastly, studies on the heart-brain axis bidirectionality and the role of sex are fundamental not only to clarify the biological bases of depression-CVD comorbidity, but also to develop alternative therapies, where vagus nerve appears to be a promising target of non-invasive neuromodulation techniques. SN - 1873-7528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32598983/DEPRESSION_AND_CARDIOVASCULAR_AUTONOMIC_CONTROL:_A_MATTER_OF_VAGUS_AND_SEX_PARADOX L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0149-7634(20)30456-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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