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Diet and sedentary behaviour in relation to mortality in US adults with a cardiovascular condition: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry.
Br J Nutr. 2020 Jun 30 [Online ahead of print]BJ

Abstract

CVD is the most common chronic condition and the highest cause of mortality in the USA. The aim of the present work was to investigate diet and sedentary behaviour in relation to mortality in US CVD survivors. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted between 1999 and 2014 linked to the US mortality registry updated to 2015 were investigated. Multivariate adjusted Cox regression was used to derive mortality hazards in relation to sedentary behaviour and nutrient intake. A multiplicative and additive interaction analysis was conducted to evaluate how sedentariness and diet influence mortality in US CVD survivors. A sample of 2473 participants followed for a median period of 5·6 years resulted in 761 deaths, and 199 deaths were due to CVD. A monotone increasing relationship between time spent in sedentary activities and mortality risk was observed for all-cause and CVD mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 1·20, 95 % CI 1·09, 1·31 and HR = 1·19, 95 % CI 1·00, 1·67, respectively). Inverse mortality risks in the range of 22-34 % were observed when comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of dietary fibre, vitamin A, carotene, riboflavin and vitamin C. Sedentariness below 360 min/d and dietary fibre and vitamin intake above the median interact on an additive scale influencing positively all-cause and CVD mortality risk. Reduced sedentariness in combination with a varied diet rich in dietary fibre and vitamins appears to be a useful strategy to reduce all-cause and CVD mortality in US CVD survivors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre of Excellence for Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa. Pediatric Epidemiology, Department of Pediatrics, University Medicine Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.Hypertension in Africa Research Team, MRC Unit for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa. Medical Research Council Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Research Unit, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.School of Allied Health, Faculty of Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.Centre of Excellence for Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa. Medical Research Council Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Research Unit, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.Centre of Excellence for Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.Centre of Excellence for Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32600485

Citation

Ricci, Cristian, et al. "Diet and Sedentary Behaviour in Relation to Mortality in US Adults With a Cardiovascular Condition: Results From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked to the US Mortality Registry." The British Journal of Nutrition, 2020, pp. 1-9.
Ricci C, Leitzmann MF, Freisling H, et al. Diet and sedentary behaviour in relation to mortality in US adults with a cardiovascular condition: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry. Br J Nutr. 2020.
Ricci, C., Leitzmann, M. F., Freisling, H., Schutte, A. E., Schutte, R., Kruger, S. H., Smuts, C. M., & Pieters, M. (2020). Diet and sedentary behaviour in relation to mortality in US adults with a cardiovascular condition: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry. The British Journal of Nutrition, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114520002391
Ricci C, et al. Diet and Sedentary Behaviour in Relation to Mortality in US Adults With a Cardiovascular Condition: Results From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked to the US Mortality Registry. Br J Nutr. 2020 Jun 30;1-9. PubMed PMID: 32600485.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and sedentary behaviour in relation to mortality in US adults with a cardiovascular condition: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry. AU - Ricci,Cristian, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Freisling,Heinz, AU - Schutte,Aletta E, AU - Schutte,Rudolph, AU - Kruger,Salome H, AU - Smuts,Cornelius M, AU - Pieters,Marlien, Y1 - 2020/06/30/ PY - 2020/7/1/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline PY - 2020/7/1/entrez KW - Diet KW - Mortality KW - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey KW - Sedentary behaviour KW - US adults SP - 1 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. N2 - CVD is the most common chronic condition and the highest cause of mortality in the USA. The aim of the present work was to investigate diet and sedentary behaviour in relation to mortality in US CVD survivors. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted between 1999 and 2014 linked to the US mortality registry updated to 2015 were investigated. Multivariate adjusted Cox regression was used to derive mortality hazards in relation to sedentary behaviour and nutrient intake. A multiplicative and additive interaction analysis was conducted to evaluate how sedentariness and diet influence mortality in US CVD survivors. A sample of 2473 participants followed for a median period of 5·6 years resulted in 761 deaths, and 199 deaths were due to CVD. A monotone increasing relationship between time spent in sedentary activities and mortality risk was observed for all-cause and CVD mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 1·20, 95 % CI 1·09, 1·31 and HR = 1·19, 95 % CI 1·00, 1·67, respectively). Inverse mortality risks in the range of 22-34 % were observed when comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of dietary fibre, vitamin A, carotene, riboflavin and vitamin C. Sedentariness below 360 min/d and dietary fibre and vitamin intake above the median interact on an additive scale influencing positively all-cause and CVD mortality risk. Reduced sedentariness in combination with a varied diet rich in dietary fibre and vitamins appears to be a useful strategy to reduce all-cause and CVD mortality in US CVD survivors. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32600485/Diet_and_sedentary_behaviour_in_relation_to_mortality_in_US_adults_with_a_cardiovascular_condition._Results_from_the_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_linked_to_the_US_mortality_registry L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114520002391/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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