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Racial differences in sleep duration intersect with sex, socioeconomic status, and U.S. geographic region: The REGARDS study.
Sleep Health. 2020 Jun 26 [Online ahead of print]SH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Short and long sleep duration are associated with poor health outcomes and are most prevalent among racial/ethnic minorities. Few studies have investigated the intersection of other sociodemographic characteristics with race/ethnicity on sleep duration prevalence.

DESIGN

Longitudinal retrospective analysis of continental U.S. cohort, the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) PARTICIPANTS: Black (n = 7,547) and white (n = 12,341) adults, 56% women, ≥45 years MEASUREMENTS: At baseline (2003-07), participants reported age, sex, race, education, income, marital status, U.S. region, and employment status. The weighted average of reported sleep duration on weekdays and weekends, assessed at follow-up (2008-10), was categorized as <6, 6.0-6.99, 7.0-7.99 [reference], 8.0-8.99, and ≥9 h. Multinomial logistic regression models examined the independent and multivariable associations of sociodemographic factors with sleep duration. Interactions terms between race with education, income, region, and sex were examined.

RESULTS

Average sleep duration was 7.0 h (SD=1.3). Prevalence of short (<6 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep duration was 11.4% (n = 2,260) and 7.0% (n = 1,395), respectively. In the multivariable model, interactions terms race*income, race*sex, and race*region were significant (P < .05). Relative to white adults, black adults, were most likely to have short sleep duration. The magnitude of that likelihood increased across greater levels of household income, but with greatest odds among black adults living outside of the Southeast and Appalachian United States, particularly for men (≥$75k; black men OR = 5.47, 95%CI: 3.94,7.54; black women OR = 4.28, 95%CI: 3.08, 5.96).

CONCLUSIONS

Race in the context of socioeconomic, sex, and regional factors should be examined as key modifiers of sleep duration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Electronic address: Megan.Petrov@asu.edu.Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, USA (see disclaimer below).Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA.Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA.Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32601040

Citation

Petrov, Megan E., et al. "Racial Differences in Sleep Duration Intersect With Sex, Socioeconomic Status, and U.S. Geographic Region: the REGARDS Study." Sleep Health, 2020.
Petrov ME, Long DL, Grandner MA, et al. Racial differences in sleep duration intersect with sex, socioeconomic status, and U.S. geographic region: The REGARDS study. Sleep Health. 2020.
Petrov, M. E., Long, D. L., Grandner, M. A., MacDonald, L. A., Cribbet, M. R., Robbins, R., Cundiff, J. M., Molano, J. R., Hoffmann, C. M., Wang, X., Howard, G., & Howard, V. J. (2020). Racial differences in sleep duration intersect with sex, socioeconomic status, and U.S. geographic region: The REGARDS study. Sleep Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2020.05.004
Petrov ME, et al. Racial Differences in Sleep Duration Intersect With Sex, Socioeconomic Status, and U.S. Geographic Region: the REGARDS Study. Sleep Health. 2020 Jun 26; PubMed PMID: 32601040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial differences in sleep duration intersect with sex, socioeconomic status, and U.S. geographic region: The REGARDS study. AU - Petrov,Megan E, AU - Long,D Leann, AU - Grandner,Michael A, AU - MacDonald,Leslie A, AU - Cribbet,Matthew R, AU - Robbins,Rebecca, AU - Cundiff,Jenny M, AU - Molano,Jennifer R, AU - Hoffmann,Coles M, AU - Wang,Xuewen, AU - Howard,George, AU - Howard,Virginia J, Y1 - 2020/06/26/ PY - 2019/10/23/received PY - 2020/04/08/revised PY - 2020/05/21/accepted PY - 2020/7/1/entrez KW - Geographic region KW - Health disparities KW - Race KW - Sex KW - Sleep duration KW - Socioeconomic status JF - Sleep health JO - Sleep Health N2 - OBJECTIVES: Short and long sleep duration are associated with poor health outcomes and are most prevalent among racial/ethnic minorities. Few studies have investigated the intersection of other sociodemographic characteristics with race/ethnicity on sleep duration prevalence. DESIGN: Longitudinal retrospective analysis of continental U.S. cohort, the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) PARTICIPANTS: Black (n = 7,547) and white (n = 12,341) adults, 56% women, ≥45 years MEASUREMENTS: At baseline (2003-07), participants reported age, sex, race, education, income, marital status, U.S. region, and employment status. The weighted average of reported sleep duration on weekdays and weekends, assessed at follow-up (2008-10), was categorized as <6, 6.0-6.99, 7.0-7.99 [reference], 8.0-8.99, and ≥9 h. Multinomial logistic regression models examined the independent and multivariable associations of sociodemographic factors with sleep duration. Interactions terms between race with education, income, region, and sex were examined. RESULTS: Average sleep duration was 7.0 h (SD=1.3). Prevalence of short (<6 h) and long (≥9 h) sleep duration was 11.4% (n = 2,260) and 7.0% (n = 1,395), respectively. In the multivariable model, interactions terms race*income, race*sex, and race*region were significant (P < .05). Relative to white adults, black adults, were most likely to have short sleep duration. The magnitude of that likelihood increased across greater levels of household income, but with greatest odds among black adults living outside of the Southeast and Appalachian United States, particularly for men (≥$75k; black men OR = 5.47, 95%CI: 3.94,7.54; black women OR = 4.28, 95%CI: 3.08, 5.96). CONCLUSIONS: Race in the context of socioeconomic, sex, and regional factors should be examined as key modifiers of sleep duration. SN - 2352-7226 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32601040/Racial_differences_in_sleep_duration_intersect_with_sex,_socioeconomic_status,_and_U.S._geographic_region:_The_REGARDS_study L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2352-7218(20)30133-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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