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Reanalysis comparisons of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric jets and multiple tropopauses.
Atmos Chem Phys. 2017 Sep 30; 17(18):11541-11566.AC

Abstract

The representation of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) jet and tropopause characteristics is compared in five modern high-resolution reanalyses for 1980 through 2014. Climatologies of upper tropospheric jet, subvortex jet (the lowermost part of the stratospheric vortex), and multiple tropopause frequency distributions in MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications), ERA-I (the ECMWF interim reanalysis), JRA-55 (the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis), and CFSR (the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis) are compared with those in MERRA-2. Differences between alternate products from individual reanalysis systems are assessed; in particular, a comparison of CFSR data on model and pressure levels highlights the importance of vertical grid spacing. Most of the differences in distributions of UTLS jets and multiple tropopauses are consistent with the differences in assimilation model grids and resolution: For example, ERA-I (with coarsest native horizontal resolution) typically shows a significant low bias in upper tropospheric jets with respect to MERRA-2, and JRA-55 a more modest one, while CFSR (with finest native horizontal resolution) shows a high bias with respect to MERRA-2 in both upper tropospheric jets and multiple tropopauses. Vertical temperature structure and grid spacing are especially important for multiple tropopause characterization. Substantial differences between MERRA and MERRA-2 are seen in mid- to high-latitude southern hemisphere winter upper tropospheric jets and multiple tropopauses, and in the upper tropospheric jets associated with tropical circulations during the solstice seasons; some of the largest differences from the other reanalyses are seen in the same times and places. Very good qualitative agreement among the reanalyses is seen between the large scale climatological features in UTLS jet and multiple tropopause distributions. Quantitative differences may, however, have important consequences for transport and variability studies. Our results highlight the importance of considering reanalyses differences in UTLS studies, especially in relation to resolution and model grids; this is particularly critical when using high-resolution reanalyses as an observational reference for evaluating global chemistry climate models.

Authors+Show Affiliations

NorthWest Research Associates, Socorro, NM USA. New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM USA.University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom.New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM USA.NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32602860

Citation

Manney, Gloria L., et al. "Reanalysis Comparisons of Upper Tropospheric/lower Stratospheric Jets and Multiple Tropopauses." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 17, no. 18, 2017, pp. 11541-11566.
Manney GL, Hegglin MI, Lawrence ZD, et al. Reanalysis comparisons of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric jets and multiple tropopauses. Atmos Chem Phys. 2017;17(18):11541-11566.
Manney, G. L., Hegglin, M. I., Lawrence, Z. D., Wargan, K., Millán, L. F., Schwartz, M. J., Santee, M. L., Lambert, A., Pawson, S., Knosp, B. W., Fuller, R. A., & Daffer, W. H. (2017). Reanalysis comparisons of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric jets and multiple tropopauses. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 17(18), 11541-11566. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11541-2017
Manney GL, et al. Reanalysis Comparisons of Upper Tropospheric/lower Stratospheric Jets and Multiple Tropopauses. Atmos Chem Phys. 2017 Sep 30;17(18):11541-11566. PubMed PMID: 32602860.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reanalysis comparisons of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric jets and multiple tropopauses. AU - Manney,Gloria L, AU - Hegglin,Michaela I, AU - Lawrence,Zachary D, AU - Wargan,Krzysztof, AU - Millán,Luis F, AU - Schwartz,Michael J, AU - Santee,Michelle L, AU - Lambert,Alyn, AU - Pawson,Steven, AU - Knosp,Brian W, AU - Fuller,Ryan A, AU - Daffer,William H, Y1 - 2017/09/27/ PY - 2020/7/1/entrez PY - 2017/9/30/pubmed PY - 2017/9/30/medline SP - 11541 EP - 11566 JF - Atmospheric chemistry and physics JO - Atmos Chem Phys VL - 17 IS - 18 N2 - The representation of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UTLS) jet and tropopause characteristics is compared in five modern high-resolution reanalyses for 1980 through 2014. Climatologies of upper tropospheric jet, subvortex jet (the lowermost part of the stratospheric vortex), and multiple tropopause frequency distributions in MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications), ERA-I (the ECMWF interim reanalysis), JRA-55 (the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis), and CFSR (the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis) are compared with those in MERRA-2. Differences between alternate products from individual reanalysis systems are assessed; in particular, a comparison of CFSR data on model and pressure levels highlights the importance of vertical grid spacing. Most of the differences in distributions of UTLS jets and multiple tropopauses are consistent with the differences in assimilation model grids and resolution: For example, ERA-I (with coarsest native horizontal resolution) typically shows a significant low bias in upper tropospheric jets with respect to MERRA-2, and JRA-55 a more modest one, while CFSR (with finest native horizontal resolution) shows a high bias with respect to MERRA-2 in both upper tropospheric jets and multiple tropopauses. Vertical temperature structure and grid spacing are especially important for multiple tropopause characterization. Substantial differences between MERRA and MERRA-2 are seen in mid- to high-latitude southern hemisphere winter upper tropospheric jets and multiple tropopauses, and in the upper tropospheric jets associated with tropical circulations during the solstice seasons; some of the largest differences from the other reanalyses are seen in the same times and places. Very good qualitative agreement among the reanalyses is seen between the large scale climatological features in UTLS jet and multiple tropopause distributions. Quantitative differences may, however, have important consequences for transport and variability studies. Our results highlight the importance of considering reanalyses differences in UTLS studies, especially in relation to resolution and model grids; this is particularly critical when using high-resolution reanalyses as an observational reference for evaluating global chemistry climate models. SN - 1680-7316 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32602860/Reanalysis_comparisons_of_upper_tropospheric/lower_stratospheric_jets_and_multiple_tropopauses L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/32602860/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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