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The Emotional Verbal Fluency Task: A Close Examination of Verbal Productivity and Lexical-Semantic Properties.
J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2020 Jul 20; 63(7):2345-2360.JS

Abstract

Purpose Emotional verbal fluency (Emo-VF) has the potential to expand neuropsychological assessment by providing information about affective memory retrieval. The usability of Emo-VF is limited, however, by significant variations in task administration and the lack of information about Emo-VF responses. This study investigated verbal productivity and the lexical-semantic properties of responses on positive and negative Emo-VF tasks. Comparing Emo-VF to non-Emo-VF tasks used regularly in neuropsychological assessment provided additional information about the basic characteristics of Emo-VF tasks. Method Twenty-five adult native speakers provided verbal responses to three Emo-VF ("happy," "sad," "negative emotions") and two non-Emo-VF categories ("animals," "things people do"). Verbal productivity was measured at the word and syllable levels. Multiple large-scale data corpora were used to estimate the lexical-semantic properties of the verbal responses. Results There was a robust positivity bias in verbal productivity within Emo-VF tasks. Emo-VF tasks tended to elicit longer words than "animals" and "things people do," which might impact the results of verbal productivity analyses, especially in comparisons with "things people do." Within Emo-VF tasks, negative Emo-VF elicited words from a wider range of valence than positive Emo-VF tasks. Similarities (e.g., word length and complexity) and differences (e.g., concreteness, age of acquisition) were found between positive and negative Emo-VF tasks. Conclusions The study provided information about the basic characteristics of Emo-VF tasks, which included evidence for a robust positivity bias, suggestions for analyses of verbal productivity (e.g., consideration of word length), and lexical-semantic properties associated with positive and negative Emo-VF tasks using corpora data.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology, University of North Texas, Denton.The University of Texas at Austin.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32603619

Citation

Lam, Boji P W., and Thomas P. Marquardt. "The Emotional Verbal Fluency Task: a Close Examination of Verbal Productivity and Lexical-Semantic Properties." Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research : JSLHR, vol. 63, no. 7, 2020, pp. 2345-2360.
Lam BPW, Marquardt TP. The Emotional Verbal Fluency Task: A Close Examination of Verbal Productivity and Lexical-Semantic Properties. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2020;63(7):2345-2360.
Lam, B. P. W., & Marquardt, T. P. (2020). The Emotional Verbal Fluency Task: A Close Examination of Verbal Productivity and Lexical-Semantic Properties. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research : JSLHR, 63(7), 2345-2360. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00276
Lam BPW, Marquardt TP. The Emotional Verbal Fluency Task: a Close Examination of Verbal Productivity and Lexical-Semantic Properties. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2020 Jul 20;63(7):2345-2360. PubMed PMID: 32603619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Emotional Verbal Fluency Task: A Close Examination of Verbal Productivity and Lexical-Semantic Properties. AU - Lam,Boji P W, AU - Marquardt,Thomas P, Y1 - 2020/06/30/ PY - 2020/7/1/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline PY - 2020/7/1/entrez SP - 2345 EP - 2360 JF - Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR JO - J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res. VL - 63 IS - 7 N2 - Purpose Emotional verbal fluency (Emo-VF) has the potential to expand neuropsychological assessment by providing information about affective memory retrieval. The usability of Emo-VF is limited, however, by significant variations in task administration and the lack of information about Emo-VF responses. This study investigated verbal productivity and the lexical-semantic properties of responses on positive and negative Emo-VF tasks. Comparing Emo-VF to non-Emo-VF tasks used regularly in neuropsychological assessment provided additional information about the basic characteristics of Emo-VF tasks. Method Twenty-five adult native speakers provided verbal responses to three Emo-VF ("happy," "sad," "negative emotions") and two non-Emo-VF categories ("animals," "things people do"). Verbal productivity was measured at the word and syllable levels. Multiple large-scale data corpora were used to estimate the lexical-semantic properties of the verbal responses. Results There was a robust positivity bias in verbal productivity within Emo-VF tasks. Emo-VF tasks tended to elicit longer words than "animals" and "things people do," which might impact the results of verbal productivity analyses, especially in comparisons with "things people do." Within Emo-VF tasks, negative Emo-VF elicited words from a wider range of valence than positive Emo-VF tasks. Similarities (e.g., word length and complexity) and differences (e.g., concreteness, age of acquisition) were found between positive and negative Emo-VF tasks. Conclusions The study provided information about the basic characteristics of Emo-VF tasks, which included evidence for a robust positivity bias, suggestions for analyses of verbal productivity (e.g., consideration of word length), and lexical-semantic properties associated with positive and negative Emo-VF tasks using corpora data. SN - 1558-9102 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32603619/The_Emotional_Verbal_Fluency_Task:_A_Close_Examination_of_Verbal_Productivity_and_Lexical-Semantic_Properties L2 - https://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2020_JSLHR-19-00276?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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