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Ibuprofen versus acetazolamide for prevention of acute mountain sickness.
Medwave. 2020 Jun 11; 20(5):e7733.M

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Acute mountain sickness is a common condition occurring in healthy subjects that undergo rapid ascent without prior acclimatization, as low as 2500 meters above sea level. The classic preventive agent has been acetazolamide, although in the last decade there has been evidence favoring ibuprofen. However, it is unclear which method is more efficient.

METHODS

We searched in Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis) and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS

We identified two systematic reviews that included only one primary study, which is a randomized trial. We concluded it is not possible to establish whether ibuprofen is better or worse than acetazolamide because the certainty of evidence has been evaluated as very low.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Proyecto Epistemonikos, Santiago, Chile.Proyecto Epistemonikos, Santiago, Chile; Departamento de Traumatología, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Email: sirraraz@gmail.com. Address: Centro Evidencia UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Diagonal Paraguay 476, Santiago, Chile.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

spa eng

PubMed ID

32604398

Citation

Schilling, Maximilian, and Sebastián Irarrázaval. "Ibuprofen Versus Acetazolamide for Prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness." Medwave, vol. 20, no. 5, 2020, pp. e7733.
Schilling M, Irarrázaval S. Ibuprofen versus acetazolamide for prevention of acute mountain sickness. Medwave. 2020;20(5):e7733.
Schilling, M., & Irarrázaval, S. (2020). Ibuprofen versus acetazolamide for prevention of acute mountain sickness. Medwave, 20(5), e7733. https://doi.org/10.5867/medwave.2020.05.7732
Schilling M, Irarrázaval S. Ibuprofen Versus Acetazolamide for Prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness. Medwave. 2020 Jun 11;20(5):e7733. PubMed PMID: 32604398.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ibuprofen versus acetazolamide for prevention of acute mountain sickness. AU - Schilling,Maximilian, AU - Irarrázaval,Sebastián, Y1 - 2020/06/11/ PY - 2019/10/17/received PY - 2019/11/21/accepted PY - 2020/7/1/entrez PY - 2020/7/1/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline KW - Epistemonikos KW - GRADE. KW - NSAIDs KW - acetazolamide KW - high altitude illness KW - ibuprofen KW - Acute mountain sickness SP - e7733 EP - e7733 JF - Medwave JO - Medwave VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Acute mountain sickness is a common condition occurring in healthy subjects that undergo rapid ascent without prior acclimatization, as low as 2500 meters above sea level. The classic preventive agent has been acetazolamide, although in the last decade there has been evidence favoring ibuprofen. However, it is unclear which method is more efficient. METHODS: We searched in Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis) and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We identified two systematic reviews that included only one primary study, which is a randomized trial. We concluded it is not possible to establish whether ibuprofen is better or worse than acetazolamide because the certainty of evidence has been evaluated as very low. SN - 0717-6384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32604398/Ibuprofen_versus_acetazolamide_for_prevention_of_acute_mountain_sickness DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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